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Mild form of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection detected by active surveillance: implications for infection control.
Am J Infect Control 2010; 38(6):482-5AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Screening patients with suspected influenza is a key step for infection control within communities and institutions. By analyzing the clinical characteristics of mild 2009 H1N1 influenza cases detected by active surveillance, we assessed the utility of the commonly used influenza case definition.

METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 44 patients who were hospitalized and quarantined and who tested positive for the 2009 H1N1 virus using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction between May 29 and July 28, 2009.

RESULTS

Patient median age was 17 years (range, 8-79 years), and 37 patients were male (84%). Common symptoms included cough (34/44; 77.3%), subjective fever (23/44; 52.3%), rhinorrhea or nasal congestion (22/44; 50%), sore throat (19/44; 43.2%), and diarrhea (7/44; 15.9%). All patients were treated with oseltamivir after the onset of initial symptoms (mean, 2.6 days). Common laboratory test results included leucopenia (23/44; 52.3%) and mildly elevated C-reactive protein (26/44; 59.1%).

CONCLUSION

There were many mild afebrile cases of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza. Cough, mild leukopenia, and mildly elevated C-reactive protein were relatively common clinical manifestations. Thus, case-based surveillance for the index cluster of 2009 pandemic influenza is not an effective method for infection control in communities or hospital settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Lung Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20416971

Citation

Jeong, Ina, et al. "Mild Form of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Infection Detected By Active Surveillance: Implications for Infection Control." American Journal of Infection Control, vol. 38, no. 6, 2010, pp. 482-5.
Jeong I, Lee CH, Kim DK, et al. Mild form of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection detected by active surveillance: implications for infection control. Am J Infect Control. 2010;38(6):482-5.
Jeong, I., Lee, C. H., Kim, D. K., Chung, H. S., & Park, S. W. (2010). Mild form of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection detected by active surveillance: implications for infection control. American Journal of Infection Control, 38(6), pp. 482-5. doi:10.1016/j.ajic.2010.02.006.
Jeong I, et al. Mild Form of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Infection Detected By Active Surveillance: Implications for Infection Control. Am J Infect Control. 2010;38(6):482-5. PubMed PMID: 20416971.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mild form of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection detected by active surveillance: implications for infection control. AU - Jeong,Ina, AU - Lee,Chang-hoon, AU - Kim,Deog Kyeom, AU - Chung,Hee Soon, AU - Park,Sang Won, Y1 - 2010/04/24/ PY - 2009/12/24/received PY - 2010/02/25/revised PY - 2010/02/27/accepted PY - 2010/4/27/entrez PY - 2010/4/27/pubmed PY - 2010/11/3/medline SP - 482 EP - 5 JF - American journal of infection control JO - Am J Infect Control VL - 38 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Screening patients with suspected influenza is a key step for infection control within communities and institutions. By analyzing the clinical characteristics of mild 2009 H1N1 influenza cases detected by active surveillance, we assessed the utility of the commonly used influenza case definition. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 44 patients who were hospitalized and quarantined and who tested positive for the 2009 H1N1 virus using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction between May 29 and July 28, 2009. RESULTS: Patient median age was 17 years (range, 8-79 years), and 37 patients were male (84%). Common symptoms included cough (34/44; 77.3%), subjective fever (23/44; 52.3%), rhinorrhea or nasal congestion (22/44; 50%), sore throat (19/44; 43.2%), and diarrhea (7/44; 15.9%). All patients were treated with oseltamivir after the onset of initial symptoms (mean, 2.6 days). Common laboratory test results included leucopenia (23/44; 52.3%) and mildly elevated C-reactive protein (26/44; 59.1%). CONCLUSION: There were many mild afebrile cases of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza. Cough, mild leukopenia, and mildly elevated C-reactive protein were relatively common clinical manifestations. Thus, case-based surveillance for the index cluster of 2009 pandemic influenza is not an effective method for infection control in communities or hospital settings. SN - 1527-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20416971/Mild_form_of_2009_H1N1_influenza_infection_detected_by_active_surveillance:_implications_for_infection_control_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-6553(10)00185-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -