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Acute mountain sickness: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2010 May-Jun; 52(6):467-84.PC

Abstract

Barometric pressure falls with increasing altitude and consequently there is a reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen resulting in a hypoxic challenge to any individual ascending to altitude. A spectrum of high altitude illnesses can occur when the hypoxic stress outstrips the subject's ability to acclimatize. Acute altitude-related problems consist of the common syndrome of acute mountain sickness, which is relatively benign and usually self-limiting, and the rarer, more serious syndromes of high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. A common feature of acute altitude illness is rapid ascent by otherwise fit individuals to altitudes above 3000 m without sufficient time to acclimatize. The susceptibility of an individual to high-altitude syndromes is variable but generally reproducible. Prevention of altitude-related illness by slow ascent is the best approach, but this is not always practical. The immediate management of serious illness requires oxygen (if available) and descent of more than 300 m as soon as possible. In this article, we describe the setting and clinical features of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema, including an overview of the known pathophysiology, and explain contemporary practices for both prevention and treatment exploring the comprehensive evidence base for the various interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Warwick Medical School, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. chrisimray@aim.com <chrisimray@aim.com>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20417340

Citation

Imray, Chris, et al. "Acute Mountain Sickness: Pathophysiology, Prevention, and Treatment." Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 52, no. 6, 2010, pp. 467-84.
Imray C, Wright A, Subudhi A, et al. Acute mountain sickness: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;52(6):467-84.
Imray, C., Wright, A., Subudhi, A., & Roach, R. (2010). Acute mountain sickness: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, 52(6), 467-84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2010.02.003
Imray C, et al. Acute Mountain Sickness: Pathophysiology, Prevention, and Treatment. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2010 May-Jun;52(6):467-84. PubMed PMID: 20417340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute mountain sickness: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment. AU - Imray,Chris, AU - Wright,Alex, AU - Subudhi,Andrew, AU - Roach,Robert, PY - 2010/4/27/entrez PY - 2010/4/27/pubmed PY - 2010/5/14/medline SP - 467 EP - 84 JF - Progress in cardiovascular diseases JO - Prog Cardiovasc Dis VL - 52 IS - 6 N2 - Barometric pressure falls with increasing altitude and consequently there is a reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen resulting in a hypoxic challenge to any individual ascending to altitude. A spectrum of high altitude illnesses can occur when the hypoxic stress outstrips the subject's ability to acclimatize. Acute altitude-related problems consist of the common syndrome of acute mountain sickness, which is relatively benign and usually self-limiting, and the rarer, more serious syndromes of high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. A common feature of acute altitude illness is rapid ascent by otherwise fit individuals to altitudes above 3000 m without sufficient time to acclimatize. The susceptibility of an individual to high-altitude syndromes is variable but generally reproducible. Prevention of altitude-related illness by slow ascent is the best approach, but this is not always practical. The immediate management of serious illness requires oxygen (if available) and descent of more than 300 m as soon as possible. In this article, we describe the setting and clinical features of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema, including an overview of the known pathophysiology, and explain contemporary practices for both prevention and treatment exploring the comprehensive evidence base for the various interventions. SN - 1873-1740 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20417340/Acute_mountain_sickness:_pathophysiology_prevention_and_treatment_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -