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High-altitude exposure in patients with cardiovascular disease: risk assessment and practical recommendations.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2010 May-Jun; 52(6):512-24PC

Abstract

Because of the development of modern transportation facilities, an ever rising number of individuals including many patients with preexisting diseases visit high-altitude locations (>2500 m). High-altitude exposure triggers a series of physiologic responses intended to maintain an adequate tissue oxygenation. Even in normal subjects, there is enormous interindividual variability in these responses that may be further amplified by environmental factors such as cold temperature, low humidity, exercise, and stress. These adaptive mechanisms, although generally tolerated by most healthy subjects, may induce major problems in patients with preexisting cardiovascular diseases in which the functional reserves are already limited. Preexposure assessment of patients helps to minimize risk and detect contraindications to high-altitude exposure. Moreover, the great variability and nonpredictability of the adaptive response should encourage physicians counseling such patients to adapt a cautionary approach. Here, we will briefly review how high-altitude adjustments may interfere with and aggravate/decompensate preexisting cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we will provide practical recommendations on how to investigate and counsel patients with cardiovascular disease desiring to travel to high-altitude locations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20417345

Citation

Rimoldi, Stefano F., et al. "High-altitude Exposure in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: Risk Assessment and Practical Recommendations." Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 52, no. 6, 2010, pp. 512-24.
Rimoldi SF, Sartori C, Seiler C, et al. High-altitude exposure in patients with cardiovascular disease: risk assessment and practical recommendations. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;52(6):512-24.
Rimoldi, S. F., Sartori, C., Seiler, C., Delacrétaz, E., Mattle, H. P., Scherrer, U., & Allemann, Y. (2010). High-altitude exposure in patients with cardiovascular disease: risk assessment and practical recommendations. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, 52(6), pp. 512-24. doi:10.1016/j.pcad.2010.03.005.
Rimoldi SF, et al. High-altitude Exposure in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: Risk Assessment and Practical Recommendations. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;52(6):512-24. PubMed PMID: 20417345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-altitude exposure in patients with cardiovascular disease: risk assessment and practical recommendations. AU - Rimoldi,Stefano F, AU - Sartori,Claudio, AU - Seiler,Christian, AU - Delacrétaz,Etienne, AU - Mattle,Heinrich P, AU - Scherrer,Urs, AU - Allemann,Yves, PY - 2010/4/27/entrez PY - 2010/4/27/pubmed PY - 2010/5/14/medline SP - 512 EP - 24 JF - Progress in cardiovascular diseases JO - Prog Cardiovasc Dis VL - 52 IS - 6 N2 - Because of the development of modern transportation facilities, an ever rising number of individuals including many patients with preexisting diseases visit high-altitude locations (>2500 m). High-altitude exposure triggers a series of physiologic responses intended to maintain an adequate tissue oxygenation. Even in normal subjects, there is enormous interindividual variability in these responses that may be further amplified by environmental factors such as cold temperature, low humidity, exercise, and stress. These adaptive mechanisms, although generally tolerated by most healthy subjects, may induce major problems in patients with preexisting cardiovascular diseases in which the functional reserves are already limited. Preexposure assessment of patients helps to minimize risk and detect contraindications to high-altitude exposure. Moreover, the great variability and nonpredictability of the adaptive response should encourage physicians counseling such patients to adapt a cautionary approach. Here, we will briefly review how high-altitude adjustments may interfere with and aggravate/decompensate preexisting cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we will provide practical recommendations on how to investigate and counsel patients with cardiovascular disease desiring to travel to high-altitude locations. SN - 1873-1740 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20417345/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0033-0620(10)00057-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -