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Cannabis with high δ9-THC contents affects perception and visual selective attention acutely: an event-related potential study.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2010; 96(1):67-74PB

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Cannabis intake has been reported to affect cognitive functions such as selective attention. This study addressed the effects of exposure to cannabis with up to 69.4mg Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) recorded during a visual selective attention task.

METHODS

Twenty-four participants smoked cannabis cigarettes with four doses of THC on four test days in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Two hours after THC exposure the participants performed a visual selective attention task and concomitant ERPs were recorded.

RESULTS

Accuracy decreased linearly and reaction times increased linearly with THC dose. However, performance measures and most of the ERP components related specifically to selective attention did not show significant dose effects. Only in relatively light cannabis users the Occipital Selection Negativity decreased linearly with dose. Furthermore, ERP components reflecting perceptual processing, as well as the P300 component, decreased in amplitude after THC exposure. Only the former effect showed a linear dose-response relation.

CONCLUSIONS

The decrements in performance and ERP amplitudes induced by exposure to cannabis with high THC content resulted from a non-selective decrease in attentional or processing resources.

SIGNIFICANCE

Performance requiring attentional resources, such as vehicle control, may be compromised several hours after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high doses of THC, as presently available in Europe and Northern America.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. Psychopharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Studies & Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht University, The Netherlands. K.B.E.Bocker@uu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20417659

Citation

Böcker, K B E., et al. "Cannabis With High δ9-THC Contents Affects Perception and Visual Selective Attention Acutely: an Event-related Potential Study." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 96, no. 1, 2010, pp. 67-74.
Böcker KB, Gerritsen J, Hunault CC, et al. Cannabis with high δ9-THC contents affects perception and visual selective attention acutely: an event-related potential study. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2010;96(1):67-74.
Böcker, K. B., Gerritsen, J., Hunault, C. C., Kruidenier, M., Mensinga, T. T., & Kenemans, J. L. (2010). Cannabis with high δ9-THC contents affects perception and visual selective attention acutely: an event-related potential study. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 96(1), pp. 67-74. doi:10.1016/j.pbb.2010.04.008.
Böcker KB, et al. Cannabis With High δ9-THC Contents Affects Perception and Visual Selective Attention Acutely: an Event-related Potential Study. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2010;96(1):67-74. PubMed PMID: 20417659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis with high δ9-THC contents affects perception and visual selective attention acutely: an event-related potential study. AU - Böcker,K B E, AU - Gerritsen,J, AU - Hunault,C C, AU - Kruidenier,M, AU - Mensinga,Tj T, AU - Kenemans,J L, Y1 - 2010/04/24/ PY - 2008/11/18/received PY - 2010/03/29/revised PY - 2010/04/12/accepted PY - 2010/4/27/entrez PY - 2010/4/27/pubmed PY - 2011/2/24/medline SP - 67 EP - 74 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. VL - 96 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Cannabis intake has been reported to affect cognitive functions such as selective attention. This study addressed the effects of exposure to cannabis with up to 69.4mg Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) recorded during a visual selective attention task. METHODS: Twenty-four participants smoked cannabis cigarettes with four doses of THC on four test days in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Two hours after THC exposure the participants performed a visual selective attention task and concomitant ERPs were recorded. RESULTS: Accuracy decreased linearly and reaction times increased linearly with THC dose. However, performance measures and most of the ERP components related specifically to selective attention did not show significant dose effects. Only in relatively light cannabis users the Occipital Selection Negativity decreased linearly with dose. Furthermore, ERP components reflecting perceptual processing, as well as the P300 component, decreased in amplitude after THC exposure. Only the former effect showed a linear dose-response relation. CONCLUSIONS: The decrements in performance and ERP amplitudes induced by exposure to cannabis with high THC content resulted from a non-selective decrease in attentional or processing resources. SIGNIFICANCE: Performance requiring attentional resources, such as vehicle control, may be compromised several hours after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high doses of THC, as presently available in Europe and Northern America. SN - 1873-5177 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20417659/Cannabis_with_high_δ9_THC_contents_affects_perception_and_visual_selective_attention_acutely:_an_event_related_potential_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-3057(10)00103-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -