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Heart transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008.
Am J Transplant. 2010 Apr; 10(4 Pt 2):1035-46.AJ

Abstract

This article features 1999-2008 trends in heart transplantation, as seen in data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Despite a 32% decline in actively listed candidates over the decade, there was a 20% increase from 2007 to 2008. There continues to be an increase in listed candidates diagnosed with congenital heart disease or retransplantation. The proportion of patients listed as Status 1A and 1B continues to increase, with a decrease in Status 2 listings. Waiting list mortality decreased from 2000 through 2007, but increased 18% from 2007 to 2008; despite the increase in waiting list death rates in 2008, waiting list mortality for Status 1A and Status 1B continues to decrease. Recipient numbers have varied by 10% over the past decade, with an increased proportion of transplants performed in infants and patients above 65 years of age. Despite the increase in Status 1A and Status 1B recipients at transplant, posttransplant survival has continued to improve. With the rise in infant candidates for transplantation and their high waiting list mortality, better means of supporting infants in need of transplant and allocation of organs to infant candidates is clearly needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20420651

Citation

Johnson, M R., et al. "Heart Transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008." American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, vol. 10, no. 4 Pt 2, 2010, pp. 1035-46.
Johnson MR, Meyer KH, Haft J, et al. Heart transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008. Am J Transplant. 2010;10(4 Pt 2):1035-46.
Johnson, M. R., Meyer, K. H., Haft, J., Kinder, D., Webber, S. A., & Dyke, D. B. (2010). Heart transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008. American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 10(4 Pt 2), 1035-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2010.03042.x
Johnson MR, et al. Heart Transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008. Am J Transplant. 2010;10(4 Pt 2):1035-46. PubMed PMID: 20420651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heart transplantation in the United States, 1999-2008. AU - Johnson,M R, AU - Meyer,K H, AU - Haft,J, AU - Kinder,D, AU - Webber,S A, AU - Dyke,D B, PY - 2010/4/28/entrez PY - 2010/4/28/pubmed PY - 2010/7/21/medline SP - 1035 EP - 46 JF - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons JO - Am. J. Transplant. VL - 10 IS - 4 Pt 2 N2 - This article features 1999-2008 trends in heart transplantation, as seen in data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Despite a 32% decline in actively listed candidates over the decade, there was a 20% increase from 2007 to 2008. There continues to be an increase in listed candidates diagnosed with congenital heart disease or retransplantation. The proportion of patients listed as Status 1A and 1B continues to increase, with a decrease in Status 2 listings. Waiting list mortality decreased from 2000 through 2007, but increased 18% from 2007 to 2008; despite the increase in waiting list death rates in 2008, waiting list mortality for Status 1A and Status 1B continues to decrease. Recipient numbers have varied by 10% over the past decade, with an increased proportion of transplants performed in infants and patients above 65 years of age. Despite the increase in Status 1A and Status 1B recipients at transplant, posttransplant survival has continued to improve. With the rise in infant candidates for transplantation and their high waiting list mortality, better means of supporting infants in need of transplant and allocation of organs to infant candidates is clearly needed. SN - 1600-6143 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20420651/Heart_transplantation_in_the_United_States_1999_2008_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2010.03042.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -