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Sex differences in jealousy: a contribution from attachment theory.
Psychol Sci. 2010 Feb; 21(2):168-73.PS

Abstract

Studies have found that more men than women endorse sexual infidelity as more distressing than emotional infidelity, whereas more women than men endorse emotional infidelity as more distressing than sexual infidelity. Some evolutionary psychologists have proposed that this sex difference can be best conceptualized as reflecting evolution-based differences in parental investment that produce a need for paternity certainty among men and a need for male investment in offspring among women. Nonetheless, a conspicuous subset of men report emotional infidelity as more distressing than sexual infidelity. Current theorizing explains between-sex differences but not within-sex differences. We hypothesized that attachment-style differences may help to explain both between- and within-sex differences in jealousy. As hypothesized, dismissing avoidant participants reported more jealousy regarding sexual than emotional infidelity (64.8%), and secure participants, including secure men, reported more jealousy regarding emotional than sexual infidelity (77.3%), chi(2)(3, N = 411) = 45.03, p < .001. A series of sequential logistic regression analyses indicated significant moderation of the sex-jealousy relationship by attachment style. Implications of an attachment perspective are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16803, USA. klevy@psu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20424039

Citation

Levy, Kenneth N., and Kristen M. Kelly. "Sex Differences in Jealousy: a Contribution From Attachment Theory." Psychological Science, vol. 21, no. 2, 2010, pp. 168-73.
Levy KN, Kelly KM. Sex differences in jealousy: a contribution from attachment theory. Psychol Sci. 2010;21(2):168-73.
Levy, K. N., & Kelly, K. M. (2010). Sex differences in jealousy: a contribution from attachment theory. Psychological Science, 21(2), 168-73. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797609357708
Levy KN, Kelly KM. Sex Differences in Jealousy: a Contribution From Attachment Theory. Psychol Sci. 2010;21(2):168-73. PubMed PMID: 20424039.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in jealousy: a contribution from attachment theory. AU - Levy,Kenneth N, AU - Kelly,Kristen M, Y1 - 2009/12/22/ PY - 2010/4/29/entrez PY - 2010/4/29/pubmed PY - 2010/9/29/medline SP - 168 EP - 73 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Studies have found that more men than women endorse sexual infidelity as more distressing than emotional infidelity, whereas more women than men endorse emotional infidelity as more distressing than sexual infidelity. Some evolutionary psychologists have proposed that this sex difference can be best conceptualized as reflecting evolution-based differences in parental investment that produce a need for paternity certainty among men and a need for male investment in offspring among women. Nonetheless, a conspicuous subset of men report emotional infidelity as more distressing than sexual infidelity. Current theorizing explains between-sex differences but not within-sex differences. We hypothesized that attachment-style differences may help to explain both between- and within-sex differences in jealousy. As hypothesized, dismissing avoidant participants reported more jealousy regarding sexual than emotional infidelity (64.8%), and secure participants, including secure men, reported more jealousy regarding emotional than sexual infidelity (77.3%), chi(2)(3, N = 411) = 45.03, p < .001. A series of sequential logistic regression analyses indicated significant moderation of the sex-jealousy relationship by attachment style. Implications of an attachment perspective are discussed. SN - 1467-9280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20424039/Sex_differences_in_jealousy:_a_contribution_from_attachment_theory_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -