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Diversity dynamics of Miocene mammals in relation to the history of tectonism and climate.
Proc Biol Sci. 2010 Sep 07; 277(1694):2721-6.PB

Abstract

Continental biodiversity gradients result not only from ecological processes, but also from evolutionary and geohistorical processes involving biotic turnover in landscape and climatic history over millions of years. Here, we investigate the evolutionary and historical contributions to the gradient of increasing species richness with topographic complexity. We analysed a dataset of 418 fossil rodent species from western North America spanning 25 to 5 Ma. We compared diversification histories between tectonically active (Intermontane West) and quiescent (Great Plains) regions. Although diversification histories differed between the two regions, species richness, origination rate and extinction rate per million years were not systematically different over the 20 Myr interval. In the tectonically active region, the greatest increase in originations coincided with a Middle Miocene episode of intensified tectonic activity and global warming. During subsequent global cooling, species richness declined in the montane region and increased on the Great Plains. These results suggest that interactions between tectonic activity and climate change stimulate diversification in mammals. The elevational diversity gradient characteristic of modern mammalian faunas was not a persistent feature over geologic time. Rather, the Miocene rodent record suggests that the elevational diversity gradient is a transient feature arising during particular episodes of Earth's history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2534 C.C. Little Building, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. john.finarelli@umich.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20427339

Citation

Finarelli, John A., and Catherine Badgley. "Diversity Dynamics of Miocene Mammals in Relation to the History of Tectonism and Climate." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 277, no. 1694, 2010, pp. 2721-6.
Finarelli JA, Badgley C. Diversity dynamics of Miocene mammals in relation to the history of tectonism and climate. Proc Biol Sci. 2010;277(1694):2721-6.
Finarelli, J. A., & Badgley, C. (2010). Diversity dynamics of Miocene mammals in relation to the history of tectonism and climate. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 277(1694), 2721-6. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2010.0348
Finarelli JA, Badgley C. Diversity Dynamics of Miocene Mammals in Relation to the History of Tectonism and Climate. Proc Biol Sci. 2010 Sep 7;277(1694):2721-6. PubMed PMID: 20427339.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diversity dynamics of Miocene mammals in relation to the history of tectonism and climate. AU - Finarelli,John A, AU - Badgley,Catherine, Y1 - 2010/04/28/ PY - 2010/4/30/entrez PY - 2010/4/30/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 2721 EP - 6 JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc Biol Sci VL - 277 IS - 1694 N2 - Continental biodiversity gradients result not only from ecological processes, but also from evolutionary and geohistorical processes involving biotic turnover in landscape and climatic history over millions of years. Here, we investigate the evolutionary and historical contributions to the gradient of increasing species richness with topographic complexity. We analysed a dataset of 418 fossil rodent species from western North America spanning 25 to 5 Ma. We compared diversification histories between tectonically active (Intermontane West) and quiescent (Great Plains) regions. Although diversification histories differed between the two regions, species richness, origination rate and extinction rate per million years were not systematically different over the 20 Myr interval. In the tectonically active region, the greatest increase in originations coincided with a Middle Miocene episode of intensified tectonic activity and global warming. During subsequent global cooling, species richness declined in the montane region and increased on the Great Plains. These results suggest that interactions between tectonic activity and climate change stimulate diversification in mammals. The elevational diversity gradient characteristic of modern mammalian faunas was not a persistent feature over geologic time. Rather, the Miocene rodent record suggests that the elevational diversity gradient is a transient feature arising during particular episodes of Earth's history. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20427339/Diversity_dynamics_of_Miocene_mammals_in_relation_to_the_history_of_tectonism_and_climate_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2010.0348?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -