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Interim results: state-specific seasonal influenza vaccination coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Apr 30; 59(16):477-84.MM

Abstract

The advent of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in April 2009 made the 2009-10 influenza season highly unusual. Public awareness of the potential seriousness of influenza was heightened by media coverage of pandemic-associated hospitalizations and deaths, especially among younger persons. In the fall, the distribution of two separate influenza vaccines began, with distinct, although overlapping, recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). In addition, 2009-10 was the first full season in which ACIP's recommendation to vaccinate all children aged 5--18 years was implemented. To provide preliminary state-specific estimates of seasonal influenza vaccination coverage, CDC analyzed Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS) data collected during October 2009-February 2010. By January 31, estimated state seasonal influenza vaccination coverage among persons aged >or=6 months ranged from 30.3% to 54.5% (median: 40.6%). Median coverage was 41.2% for children aged 6 months-17 years, 38.3% for adults aged 18--49 years with high-risk conditions, 28.8% for adults aged 18-49 years without high-risk conditions, 45.5% for adults aged 50-64 years, and 69.3% for adults aged >or=65 years. These results, compared with the previous season, suggest large increases in coverage for children and a moderate increase for adults aged 18-49 years without high-risk conditions. Health departments should identify best practices that lead to higher vaccination coverage and should support effective vaccination services (e.g., school-located vaccination programs and office-based protocols, such as reminder/recall and standing orders).

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20431523

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Interim Results: State-specific Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. 16, 2010, pp. 477-84.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Interim results: state-specific seasonal influenza vaccination coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010;59(16):477-84.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2010). Interim results: state-specific seasonal influenza vaccination coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 59(16), 477-84.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Interim Results: State-specific Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Apr 30;59(16):477-84. PubMed PMID: 20431523.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interim results: state-specific seasonal influenza vaccination coverage - United States, August 2009-January 2010. A1 - ,, PY - 2010/5/1/entrez PY - 2010/5/1/pubmed PY - 2010/5/4/medline SP - 477 EP - 84 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 59 IS - 16 N2 - The advent of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in April 2009 made the 2009-10 influenza season highly unusual. Public awareness of the potential seriousness of influenza was heightened by media coverage of pandemic-associated hospitalizations and deaths, especially among younger persons. In the fall, the distribution of two separate influenza vaccines began, with distinct, although overlapping, recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). In addition, 2009-10 was the first full season in which ACIP's recommendation to vaccinate all children aged 5--18 years was implemented. To provide preliminary state-specific estimates of seasonal influenza vaccination coverage, CDC analyzed Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS) data collected during October 2009-February 2010. By January 31, estimated state seasonal influenza vaccination coverage among persons aged >or=6 months ranged from 30.3% to 54.5% (median: 40.6%). Median coverage was 41.2% for children aged 6 months-17 years, 38.3% for adults aged 18--49 years with high-risk conditions, 28.8% for adults aged 18-49 years without high-risk conditions, 45.5% for adults aged 50-64 years, and 69.3% for adults aged >or=65 years. These results, compared with the previous season, suggest large increases in coverage for children and a moderate increase for adults aged 18-49 years without high-risk conditions. Health departments should identify best practices that lead to higher vaccination coverage and should support effective vaccination services (e.g., school-located vaccination programs and office-based protocols, such as reminder/recall and standing orders). SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20431523/Interim_results:_state_specific_seasonal_influenza_vaccination_coverage___United_States_August_2009_January_2010_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5916a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -