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Vegetables, but not pickled vegetables, are negatively associated with the risk of breast cancer.
Nutr Cancer 2010; 62(4):443-53NC

Abstract

This study investigated the association between pickled vegetable consumption and the risk of breast cancer using a validated food frequency questionnaire. A total of 358 patients with breast cancer who were matched to 360 healthy controls by age (using a 5-yr age distribution) were recruited from the National Cancer Center in South Korea. After adjusting for nondietary risk factors, total vegetable intake was inversely associated with risk of breast cancer. However, unlike nonpickled vegetables, pickled vegetable intake and its proportion relative to total vegetables were positively associated with the risk of breast cancer, and this association was more profound and consistent when pickled vegetable intake was considered as a proportion relative to total vegetables (odds ratio [OR] = 6.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.55-10.97; P for trend <0.001 for highest vs. lowest quartiles of intake) than as the absolute consumed amount (OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.45-4.21; P for trend = 0.015 for highest vs. lowest quartiles of intake). These results suggest that not only the amount of total vegetable intake but also the amounts of different types of vegetable (i.e., pickled or nonpickled) and their proportions relative to total vegetables are significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Health Sciences, The Graduate School of Clinical Health Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20432165

Citation

Yu, Hyejin, et al. "Vegetables, but Not Pickled Vegetables, Are Negatively Associated With the Risk of Breast Cancer." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 62, no. 4, 2010, pp. 443-53.
Yu H, Hwang JY, Ro J, et al. Vegetables, but not pickled vegetables, are negatively associated with the risk of breast cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(4):443-53.
Yu, H., Hwang, J. Y., Ro, J., Kim, J., & Chang, N. (2010). Vegetables, but not pickled vegetables, are negatively associated with the risk of breast cancer. Nutrition and Cancer, 62(4), pp. 443-53. doi:10.1080/01635580903532374.
Yu H, et al. Vegetables, but Not Pickled Vegetables, Are Negatively Associated With the Risk of Breast Cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(4):443-53. PubMed PMID: 20432165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetables, but not pickled vegetables, are negatively associated with the risk of breast cancer. AU - Yu,Hyejin, AU - Hwang,Ji-Yun, AU - Ro,Jungsil, AU - Kim,Jeongseon, AU - Chang,Namsoo, PY - 2010/5/1/entrez PY - 2010/5/1/pubmed PY - 2010/8/13/medline SP - 443 EP - 53 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 62 IS - 4 N2 - This study investigated the association between pickled vegetable consumption and the risk of breast cancer using a validated food frequency questionnaire. A total of 358 patients with breast cancer who were matched to 360 healthy controls by age (using a 5-yr age distribution) were recruited from the National Cancer Center in South Korea. After adjusting for nondietary risk factors, total vegetable intake was inversely associated with risk of breast cancer. However, unlike nonpickled vegetables, pickled vegetable intake and its proportion relative to total vegetables were positively associated with the risk of breast cancer, and this association was more profound and consistent when pickled vegetable intake was considered as a proportion relative to total vegetables (odds ratio [OR] = 6.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.55-10.97; P for trend <0.001 for highest vs. lowest quartiles of intake) than as the absolute consumed amount (OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.45-4.21; P for trend = 0.015 for highest vs. lowest quartiles of intake). These results suggest that not only the amount of total vegetable intake but also the amounts of different types of vegetable (i.e., pickled or nonpickled) and their proportions relative to total vegetables are significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20432165/Vegetables_but_not_pickled_vegetables_are_negatively_associated_with_the_risk_of_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580903532374 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -