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[Outbreak of urban rabies transmitted by dogs in Santa Marta, northern Colombia].
Biomedica. 2009 Sep; 29(3):424-36.B

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

An urban rabies outbreak occurred in the District of Santa Marta between April 2006 and January 2008, which resulted in the deaths of 4 humans and 28 dogs.

OBJECTIVES

Three objectives were entertained-first, the diagnostic laboratory techniques were described as well as the rabies control actions taken; second, the impact of anti-rabies dog vaccination was assessed in terms of neutralizing antibody seroconversion; and third, the epidemiological significance and public health implications of the outbreak were examined.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Rabies diagnosis was achieved by direct immunofluorescence, inoculation of mice and immunohistochemistry. Typing of the virus was achieved by indirect immunofluorescence. Control activities included a dog population census, vaccination and treatments for persons exposed to rabies, mass vaccination of dogs and cats, and initiation of a community education program. Seroconversion was investigated by capture ELISA.

RESULTS

Antigenic variant 1 was detected in all cases. Of vaccinated dogs, 77% were seropositive, and 47% were seroprotected against rabies. No differences were found in the humoral response between dog gender; however significant differences in dog seroprotection were discovered between localized comunities in Santa Marta.

CONCLUSIONS

The 2006-2008 urban rabies outbreak was the largest reported in a city in Colombia. It was caused by rabid dogs, and demonstrated that these animals are still a threat for human health despite the existence of efficient rabies vaccines. The control of the outbreak was achieved 20 months after the first rabies case in dogs, and 14 months after the initiation of the first mass vaccination of animals. The necessity of implementation and maintenance of rabies control strategies is underlined for minimizing human risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. apaezm@ins.gov.co <apaezm@ins.gov.co>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

spa

PubMed ID

20436994

Citation

Páez, Andrés, et al. "[Outbreak of Urban Rabies Transmitted By Dogs in Santa Marta, Northern Colombia]." Biomedica : Revista Del Instituto Nacional De Salud, vol. 29, no. 3, 2009, pp. 424-36.
Páez A, Rey G, Agudelo C, et al. [Outbreak of urban rabies transmitted by dogs in Santa Marta, northern Colombia]. Biomedica. 2009;29(3):424-36.
Páez, A., Rey, G., Agudelo, C., Dulce, A., Parra, E., Díaz-Granados, H., Heredia, D., & Polo, L. (2009). [Outbreak of urban rabies transmitted by dogs in Santa Marta, northern Colombia]. Biomedica : Revista Del Instituto Nacional De Salud, 29(3), 424-36.
Páez A, et al. [Outbreak of Urban Rabies Transmitted By Dogs in Santa Marta, Northern Colombia]. Biomedica. 2009;29(3):424-36. PubMed PMID: 20436994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Outbreak of urban rabies transmitted by dogs in Santa Marta, northern Colombia]. AU - Páez,Andrés, AU - Rey,Gloria, AU - Agudelo,Carlos, AU - Dulce,Alvaro, AU - Parra,Edgar, AU - Díaz-Granados,Hernando, AU - Heredia,Damaris, AU - Polo,Luis, PY - 2008/10/22/received PY - 2009/04/06/accepted PY - 2010/5/4/entrez PY - 2010/5/4/pubmed PY - 2010/8/27/medline SP - 424 EP - 36 JF - Biomedica : revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud JO - Biomedica VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: An urban rabies outbreak occurred in the District of Santa Marta between April 2006 and January 2008, which resulted in the deaths of 4 humans and 28 dogs. OBJECTIVES: Three objectives were entertained-first, the diagnostic laboratory techniques were described as well as the rabies control actions taken; second, the impact of anti-rabies dog vaccination was assessed in terms of neutralizing antibody seroconversion; and third, the epidemiological significance and public health implications of the outbreak were examined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rabies diagnosis was achieved by direct immunofluorescence, inoculation of mice and immunohistochemistry. Typing of the virus was achieved by indirect immunofluorescence. Control activities included a dog population census, vaccination and treatments for persons exposed to rabies, mass vaccination of dogs and cats, and initiation of a community education program. Seroconversion was investigated by capture ELISA. RESULTS: Antigenic variant 1 was detected in all cases. Of vaccinated dogs, 77% were seropositive, and 47% were seroprotected against rabies. No differences were found in the humoral response between dog gender; however significant differences in dog seroprotection were discovered between localized comunities in Santa Marta. CONCLUSIONS: The 2006-2008 urban rabies outbreak was the largest reported in a city in Colombia. It was caused by rabid dogs, and demonstrated that these animals are still a threat for human health despite the existence of efficient rabies vaccines. The control of the outbreak was achieved 20 months after the first rabies case in dogs, and 14 months after the initiation of the first mass vaccination of animals. The necessity of implementation and maintenance of rabies control strategies is underlined for minimizing human risk. SN - 2590-7379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20436994/[Outbreak_of_urban_rabies_transmitted_by_dogs_in_Santa_Marta_northern_Colombia]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6131 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -