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Peer influence and nonsuicidal self injury: longitudinal results in community and clinically-referred adolescent samples.
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010 Jul; 38(5):669-82.JA

Abstract

Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence processes. Study 1 included 377 adolescents from a community-based sample; Study 2 included 140 clinically-referred adolescents recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility. In Study 1, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline and one year later. Adolescents' nominated best friend reported their own levels of NSSI. In Study 2, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline as well as 9 and 18-months post-baseline. Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' engagement in self-injurious behavior (including suicidality) and depressed mood also were examined at all three time points. Baseline depressive symptoms were measured in both studies; gender and age were examined as moderators of peer influence effects. Results from both studies supported longitudinal peer socialization effects of friends' self-injurious behavior on adolescents' own NSSI for girls, but not for boys, even after controlling for depressive symptoms as a predictor. Study 1 suggested socialization effects mostly for younger youth. Results from Study 2 also suggested longitudinal socialization effects, as well as peer selection effects; adolescents' NSSI was associated with increasing perceptions of their friends' engagement in depressive/self-injurious thoughts and behavior. Findings contribute to the nascent literature on longitudinal predictors of NSSI and to work on peer influence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Davie Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3270, USA. mitch.prinstein@unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20437255

Citation

Prinstein, Mitchell J., et al. "Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-referred Adolescent Samples." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 38, no. 5, 2010, pp. 669-82.
Prinstein MJ, Heilbron N, Guerry JD, et al. Peer influence and nonsuicidal self injury: longitudinal results in community and clinically-referred adolescent samples. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010;38(5):669-82.
Prinstein, M. J., Heilbron, N., Guerry, J. D., Franklin, J. C., Rancourt, D., Simon, V., & Spirito, A. (2010). Peer influence and nonsuicidal self injury: longitudinal results in community and clinically-referred adolescent samples. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 38(5), 669-82. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9423-0
Prinstein MJ, et al. Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-referred Adolescent Samples. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010;38(5):669-82. PubMed PMID: 20437255.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Peer influence and nonsuicidal self injury: longitudinal results in community and clinically-referred adolescent samples. AU - Prinstein,Mitchell J, AU - Heilbron,Nicole, AU - Guerry,John D, AU - Franklin,Joseph C, AU - Rancourt,Diana, AU - Simon,Valerie, AU - Spirito,Anthony, PY - 2010/5/4/entrez PY - 2010/5/4/pubmed PY - 2010/8/25/medline SP - 669 EP - 82 JF - Journal of abnormal child psychology JO - J Abnorm Child Psychol VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence processes. Study 1 included 377 adolescents from a community-based sample; Study 2 included 140 clinically-referred adolescents recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility. In Study 1, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline and one year later. Adolescents' nominated best friend reported their own levels of NSSI. In Study 2, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline as well as 9 and 18-months post-baseline. Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' engagement in self-injurious behavior (including suicidality) and depressed mood also were examined at all three time points. Baseline depressive symptoms were measured in both studies; gender and age were examined as moderators of peer influence effects. Results from both studies supported longitudinal peer socialization effects of friends' self-injurious behavior on adolescents' own NSSI for girls, but not for boys, even after controlling for depressive symptoms as a predictor. Study 1 suggested socialization effects mostly for younger youth. Results from Study 2 also suggested longitudinal socialization effects, as well as peer selection effects; adolescents' NSSI was associated with increasing perceptions of their friends' engagement in depressive/self-injurious thoughts and behavior. Findings contribute to the nascent literature on longitudinal predictors of NSSI and to work on peer influence. SN - 1573-2835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20437255/Peer_influence_and_nonsuicidal_self_injury:_longitudinal_results_in_community_and_clinically_referred_adolescent_samples_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9423-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -