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Association of hospitalization for infection in childhood with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders: a Danish cohort study.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 May; 164(5):470-7.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association between hospitalization for infection in the perinatal/neonatal period or childhood and the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

DESIGN

A population-based cohort study.

SETTING

Denmark.

PARTICIPANTS

All children born in Denmark from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2002, comprising a total of 1 418 152 children.

EXPOSURE

Infection requiring hospitalization.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for ASDs among children hospitalized for infection compared with other children.

RESULTS

A total of 7379 children were diagnosed as having ASDs. Children admitted to the hospital for any infectious disease displayed an increased rate of ASD diagnoses (HR, 1.38 [95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.45]). This association was found to be similar for infectious diseases of bacterial and viral origin. Furthermore, children admitted to the hospital for noninfectious disease also displayed an increased rate of ASD diagnoses (HR, 1.76 [95% confidence interval, 1.68-1.86]), and admissions for infection increased the rate of mental retardation (2.18 [2.06-2.31]).

CONCLUSIONS

The association between hospitalization for infection and ASDs observed in this study does not suggest causality because a general association is observed across different infection groups. Also, the association is not specific for infection or for ASDs. We discuss a number of noncausal explanatory models.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Arhus, Bartholin Allé 2, Arhus C, Denmark. hoa@soci.au.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20439799

Citation

Atladóttir, Hjördís Osk, et al. "Association of Hospitalization for Infection in Childhood With Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: a Danish Cohort Study." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 164, no. 5, 2010, pp. 470-7.
Atladóttir HO, Thorsen P, Schendel DE, et al. Association of hospitalization for infection in childhood with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders: a Danish cohort study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(5):470-7.
Atladóttir, H. O., Thorsen, P., Schendel, D. E., Østergaard, L., Lemcke, S., & Parner, E. T. (2010). Association of hospitalization for infection in childhood with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders: a Danish cohort study. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 164(5), 470-7. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.9
Atladóttir HO, et al. Association of Hospitalization for Infection in Childhood With Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: a Danish Cohort Study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(5):470-7. PubMed PMID: 20439799.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of hospitalization for infection in childhood with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders: a Danish cohort study. AU - Atladóttir,Hjördís Osk, AU - Thorsen,Poul, AU - Schendel,Diana E, AU - Østergaard,Lars, AU - Lemcke,Saane, AU - Parner,Erik T, PY - 2010/5/5/entrez PY - 2010/5/5/pubmed PY - 2010/6/11/medline SP - 470 EP - 7 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 164 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between hospitalization for infection in the perinatal/neonatal period or childhood and the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). DESIGN: A population-based cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: All children born in Denmark from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2002, comprising a total of 1 418 152 children. EXPOSURE: Infection requiring hospitalization. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for ASDs among children hospitalized for infection compared with other children. RESULTS: A total of 7379 children were diagnosed as having ASDs. Children admitted to the hospital for any infectious disease displayed an increased rate of ASD diagnoses (HR, 1.38 [95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.45]). This association was found to be similar for infectious diseases of bacterial and viral origin. Furthermore, children admitted to the hospital for noninfectious disease also displayed an increased rate of ASD diagnoses (HR, 1.76 [95% confidence interval, 1.68-1.86]), and admissions for infection increased the rate of mental retardation (2.18 [2.06-2.31]). CONCLUSIONS: The association between hospitalization for infection and ASDs observed in this study does not suggest causality because a general association is observed across different infection groups. Also, the association is not specific for infection or for ASDs. We discuss a number of noncausal explanatory models. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20439799/Association_of_hospitalization_for_infection_in_childhood_with_diagnosis_of_autism_spectrum_disorders:_a_Danish_cohort_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -