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Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2010; 102(11):771-83JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relationships between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk remain unresolved.

METHODS

We investigated prospectively the association between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk in a pooled analysis of primary data from 13 cohort studies. Among 731 441 participants followed for up to 6-20 years, 5604 incident colon cancer case patients were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

Compared with nonconsumers, the pooled multivariable relative risks were 1.07 (95% CI = 0.89 to 1.30, P(trend) = .68) for coffee consumption greater than 1400 g/d (about six 8-oz cups) and 1.28 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.61, P(trend) = .01) for tea consumption greater than 900 g/d (about four 8-oz cups). For sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption, the pooled multivariable relative risk comparing consumption greater than 550 g/d (about 18 oz) to nonconsumers was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.66 to 1.32, P(trend) = .91). No statistically significant between-studies heterogeneity was observed for the highest category of each beverage consumed (P > .20). The observed associations did not differ by sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical activity, or tumor site (P > .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Drinking coffee or sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks was not associated with colon cancer risk. However, a modest positive association with higher tea consumption is possible and requires further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. pooling@hsphsun2.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20453203

Citation

Zhang, Xuehong, et al. "Risk of Colon Cancer and Coffee, Tea, and Sugar-sweetened Soft Drink Intake: Pooled Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 102, no. 11, 2010, pp. 771-83.
Zhang X, Albanes D, Beeson WL, et al. Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010;102(11):771-83.
Zhang, X., Albanes, D., Beeson, W. L., van den Brandt, P. A., Buring, J. E., Flood, A., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2010). Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 102(11), pp. 771-83. doi:10.1093/jnci/djq107.
Zhang X, et al. Risk of Colon Cancer and Coffee, Tea, and Sugar-sweetened Soft Drink Intake: Pooled Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Jun 2;102(11):771-83. PubMed PMID: 20453203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Zhang,Xuehong, AU - Albanes,Demetrius, AU - Beeson,W Lawrence, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Flood,Andrew, AU - Freudenheim,Jo L, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - Jaceldo-Siegl,Karen, AU - Jacobs,Eric J, AU - Krogh,Vittorio, AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Marshall,James R, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Miller,Anthony B, AU - Robien,Kim, AU - Rohan,Thomas E, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Sieri,Sabina, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Virtamo,Jarmo, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, Y1 - 2010/05/07/ PY - 2010/5/11/entrez PY - 2010/5/11/pubmed PY - 2010/6/15/medline SP - 771 EP - 83 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 102 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationships between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk remain unresolved. METHODS: We investigated prospectively the association between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk in a pooled analysis of primary data from 13 cohort studies. Among 731 441 participants followed for up to 6-20 years, 5604 incident colon cancer case patients were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Compared with nonconsumers, the pooled multivariable relative risks were 1.07 (95% CI = 0.89 to 1.30, P(trend) = .68) for coffee consumption greater than 1400 g/d (about six 8-oz cups) and 1.28 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.61, P(trend) = .01) for tea consumption greater than 900 g/d (about four 8-oz cups). For sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption, the pooled multivariable relative risk comparing consumption greater than 550 g/d (about 18 oz) to nonconsumers was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.66 to 1.32, P(trend) = .91). No statistically significant between-studies heterogeneity was observed for the highest category of each beverage consumed (P > .20). The observed associations did not differ by sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical activity, or tumor site (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Drinking coffee or sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks was not associated with colon cancer risk. However, a modest positive association with higher tea consumption is possible and requires further study. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20453203/Risk_of_colon_cancer_and_coffee_tea_and_sugar_sweetened_soft_drink_intake:_pooled_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djq107 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -