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Oral moxifloxacin and topical amikacin for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 May; 36(5):843-6.JC

Abstract

We report a case of Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after elective laser in situ keratomileusis in a 19-year-old woman. The infection started 3 weeks after uneventful surgery, and the patient received multiple antimicrobial treatments without response. A corneal scrape isolate showed an acid-fast bacterium that was subsequently confirmed by culture to be M abscessus. Prompt treatment of oral moxifloxacin 400 mg twice daily and hourly topical amikacin 2.5% was started. Recovery occurred within the first week of treatment, with complete resolution 3 weeks after presentation. The final uncorrected distance visual acuity was 6/9. We comment on other reports of post-LASIK keratitis caused by M abscessus, the in vitro sensitivity to antibiotic agents described in the literature, and the use of oral moxifloxacin as a potential good alternative treatment based on its good ocular bioavailability, which in our case allowed resolution without the need for surgical intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom. patricio.pacheco@moorfields.nhs.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20457379

Citation

Pacheco, Patricio A., and Patrick M K. Tam. "Oral Moxifloxacin and Topical Amikacin for Mycobacterium Abscessus Keratitis After Laser in Situ Keratomileusis." Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, vol. 36, no. 5, 2010, pp. 843-6.
Pacheco PA, Tam PM. Oral moxifloxacin and topical amikacin for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010;36(5):843-6.
Pacheco, P. A., & Tam, P. M. (2010). Oral moxifloxacin and topical amikacin for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, 36(5), 843-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrs.2009.10.054
Pacheco PA, Tam PM. Oral Moxifloxacin and Topical Amikacin for Mycobacterium Abscessus Keratitis After Laser in Situ Keratomileusis. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010;36(5):843-6. PubMed PMID: 20457379.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral moxifloxacin and topical amikacin for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis. AU - Pacheco,Patricio A, AU - Tam,Patrick M K, PY - 2009/07/27/received PY - 2009/10/03/revised PY - 2009/10/04/accepted PY - 2010/5/12/entrez PY - 2010/5/12/pubmed PY - 2010/7/9/medline SP - 843 EP - 6 JF - Journal of cataract and refractive surgery JO - J Cataract Refract Surg VL - 36 IS - 5 N2 - We report a case of Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after elective laser in situ keratomileusis in a 19-year-old woman. The infection started 3 weeks after uneventful surgery, and the patient received multiple antimicrobial treatments without response. A corneal scrape isolate showed an acid-fast bacterium that was subsequently confirmed by culture to be M abscessus. Prompt treatment of oral moxifloxacin 400 mg twice daily and hourly topical amikacin 2.5% was started. Recovery occurred within the first week of treatment, with complete resolution 3 weeks after presentation. The final uncorrected distance visual acuity was 6/9. We comment on other reports of post-LASIK keratitis caused by M abscessus, the in vitro sensitivity to antibiotic agents described in the literature, and the use of oral moxifloxacin as a potential good alternative treatment based on its good ocular bioavailability, which in our case allowed resolution without the need for surgical intervention. SN - 1873-4502 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20457379/Oral_moxifloxacin_and_topical_amikacin_for_Mycobacterium_abscessus_keratitis_after_laser_in_situ_keratomileusis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0886-3350(10)00346-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -