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Intergenerational transmission of psychopathology: minor versus major parental depression.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010 May; 198(5):356-61.JN

Abstract

This study used data from the National Comorbidity Survey to investigate associations between: (1) maternal and paternal depression and young adult offspring psychopathology, and (2) major and minor parental depression and offspring psychopathology. Offspring of a depressed parent were significantly more likely to experience a psychiatric disorder by young adulthood than offspring of nondepressed parents. Major and minor maternal and paternal depression were associated with comparable increases in risk for offspring 12-month mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders and lifetime substance use disorder. However, maternal major depression was associated with a greater risk for offspring lifetime mood and anxiety disorder than maternal minor depression. Risk for lifetime mood and anxiety disorder did not differ by severity of paternal depression. These findings suggest that parental depressive symptoms that do not meet major depressive disorder criteria may nevertheless have significant adverse associations with offspring mental health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. jleis@jhsph.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20458198

Citation

Leis, Julie A., and Tamar Mendelson. "Intergenerational Transmission of Psychopathology: Minor Versus Major Parental Depression." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 198, no. 5, 2010, pp. 356-61.
Leis JA, Mendelson T. Intergenerational transmission of psychopathology: minor versus major parental depression. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010;198(5):356-61.
Leis, J. A., & Mendelson, T. (2010). Intergenerational transmission of psychopathology: minor versus major parental depression. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 198(5), 356-61. https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181da8514
Leis JA, Mendelson T. Intergenerational Transmission of Psychopathology: Minor Versus Major Parental Depression. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010;198(5):356-61. PubMed PMID: 20458198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergenerational transmission of psychopathology: minor versus major parental depression. AU - Leis,Julie A, AU - Mendelson,Tamar, PY - 2010/5/12/entrez PY - 2010/5/12/pubmed PY - 2010/5/19/medline SP - 356 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 198 IS - 5 N2 - This study used data from the National Comorbidity Survey to investigate associations between: (1) maternal and paternal depression and young adult offspring psychopathology, and (2) major and minor parental depression and offspring psychopathology. Offspring of a depressed parent were significantly more likely to experience a psychiatric disorder by young adulthood than offspring of nondepressed parents. Major and minor maternal and paternal depression were associated with comparable increases in risk for offspring 12-month mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders and lifetime substance use disorder. However, maternal major depression was associated with a greater risk for offspring lifetime mood and anxiety disorder than maternal minor depression. Risk for lifetime mood and anxiety disorder did not differ by severity of paternal depression. These findings suggest that parental depressive symptoms that do not meet major depressive disorder criteria may nevertheless have significant adverse associations with offspring mental health. SN - 1539-736X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20458198/Intergenerational_transmission_of_psychopathology:_minor_versus_major_parental_depression_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181da8514 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -