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[Complications and incidences in our first 250 robotic radical prostatectomies].
Actas Urol Esp. 2010 May; 34(5):428-39.AU

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review the incidence of and analyze the factors contributing to perioperative complications in patients undergoing robotic radical prostatectomy in our experience of 250 procedures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

An analytical, descriptive, retrospective study was conducted of 250 consecutive patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy during a period of three years and two months (January 06-March 09). Data recorded included age, preoperative Gleason grade and PSA, and prostate volume. All procedures were performed by three surgeons through a transperitoneal approach using a four-arm da Vinci robotic system. Microsoft Excel support was used. Surgical variables recorded included setup time, console operation time, mean bleeding, transfusion rate, hospital stay, and urethral catheterization time. Incidences and intraoperative and postoperative late and early complications in these patients were reviewed.

RESULTS

Demographic data recorded included: mean age, 61.5 years (47-74); mean preoperative PSA, 8.18 ng/mL (2.6-34 ng/mL); mean Gleason grade, 6.8 (2-9); and mean prostate volume 34.9 mL (12-124). Surgical variables recorded included: console setup time, 10.8 min (6-47): console operation time, 125 min (90-315); mean bleeding, 150 mL (50-1150); and a 3.6% (9/250) transfusion rate. There was no peroperative mortality, and no conversion to open or laparoscopic surgery was required. Ninety-six percent of patients (240/250) had an adequate postoperative course, with a mean hospital stay of 4.2 days (3-35) and urinary catheter removal after 8 (5-28) days. Overall complication rate was 10.6%, with major complications occurring in only 3.2% of patients (8/250) and consisting of five surgical and three medical complications. Repeat surgery was required in 1.6% of cases (4/250) due to late peritonitis for cecal perforation, bleeding from epigastric artery, perineal percutaneous drainage of retrovesical hematoma, and pelvic urinoma after bladder catheter dislodgment. One patient required selective arterial embolization for persistent hematuria due to vesical artery fistula. Medical complications included acute renal failure due to thrombotic purpura resolved with hemodialysis in one patient and late pulmonary embolism managed with anticoagulation in two patients. Robot malfunction with no surgical implications or need for surgical conversion occurred in four patients (1.6%). Surgical maneuvers required to resolve late complications included one umbilical hernia repair, one meatotomy for meatal stenosis, one bladder neck endoscopic incision after contracture, and one endoscopic extraction of Hem-o-lok and vascular clip following erosion-migration into the bladder.

CONCLUSIONS

Robotic radical prostatectomy is a safe and reproducible procedure with optimal functional and oncological results, a shorter learning curve, greater comfort and vision for surgeons, and a complication rate similar to and even better than reported for open and laparoscopic surgery series. Complications decrease with the learning curve, but surgical team experience continues to be the key factor to achieve better results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Urología, Urología Clínica, S. L., Bilbao, Spain. jpereira@urologiaclinica.bizNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

spa

PubMed ID

20470715

Citation

Pereira Arias, J G., et al. "[Complications and Incidences in Our First 250 Robotic Radical Prostatectomies]." Actas Urologicas Espanolas, vol. 34, no. 5, 2010, pp. 428-39.
Pereira Arias JG, Gamarra Quintanilla M, Leibar Tamayo A, et al. [Complications and incidences in our first 250 robotic radical prostatectomies]. Actas Urol Esp. 2010;34(5):428-39.
Pereira Arias, J. G., Gamarra Quintanilla, M., Leibar Tamayo, A., Astobieta Odriozola, A., & Ibarluzea González, G. (2010). [Complications and incidences in our first 250 robotic radical prostatectomies]. Actas Urologicas Espanolas, 34(5), 428-39.
Pereira Arias JG, et al. [Complications and Incidences in Our First 250 Robotic Radical Prostatectomies]. Actas Urol Esp. 2010;34(5):428-39. PubMed PMID: 20470715.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Complications and incidences in our first 250 robotic radical prostatectomies]. AU - Pereira Arias,J G, AU - Gamarra Quintanilla,M, AU - Leibar Tamayo,A, AU - Astobieta Odriozola,A, AU - Ibarluzea González,G, PY - 2010/5/18/entrez PY - 2010/5/18/pubmed PY - 2010/9/2/medline SP - 428 EP - 39 JF - Actas urologicas espanolas JO - Actas Urol Esp VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review the incidence of and analyze the factors contributing to perioperative complications in patients undergoing robotic radical prostatectomy in our experience of 250 procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An analytical, descriptive, retrospective study was conducted of 250 consecutive patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy during a period of three years and two months (January 06-March 09). Data recorded included age, preoperative Gleason grade and PSA, and prostate volume. All procedures were performed by three surgeons through a transperitoneal approach using a four-arm da Vinci robotic system. Microsoft Excel support was used. Surgical variables recorded included setup time, console operation time, mean bleeding, transfusion rate, hospital stay, and urethral catheterization time. Incidences and intraoperative and postoperative late and early complications in these patients were reviewed. RESULTS: Demographic data recorded included: mean age, 61.5 years (47-74); mean preoperative PSA, 8.18 ng/mL (2.6-34 ng/mL); mean Gleason grade, 6.8 (2-9); and mean prostate volume 34.9 mL (12-124). Surgical variables recorded included: console setup time, 10.8 min (6-47): console operation time, 125 min (90-315); mean bleeding, 150 mL (50-1150); and a 3.6% (9/250) transfusion rate. There was no peroperative mortality, and no conversion to open or laparoscopic surgery was required. Ninety-six percent of patients (240/250) had an adequate postoperative course, with a mean hospital stay of 4.2 days (3-35) and urinary catheter removal after 8 (5-28) days. Overall complication rate was 10.6%, with major complications occurring in only 3.2% of patients (8/250) and consisting of five surgical and three medical complications. Repeat surgery was required in 1.6% of cases (4/250) due to late peritonitis for cecal perforation, bleeding from epigastric artery, perineal percutaneous drainage of retrovesical hematoma, and pelvic urinoma after bladder catheter dislodgment. One patient required selective arterial embolization for persistent hematuria due to vesical artery fistula. Medical complications included acute renal failure due to thrombotic purpura resolved with hemodialysis in one patient and late pulmonary embolism managed with anticoagulation in two patients. Robot malfunction with no surgical implications or need for surgical conversion occurred in four patients (1.6%). Surgical maneuvers required to resolve late complications included one umbilical hernia repair, one meatotomy for meatal stenosis, one bladder neck endoscopic incision after contracture, and one endoscopic extraction of Hem-o-lok and vascular clip following erosion-migration into the bladder. CONCLUSIONS: Robotic radical prostatectomy is a safe and reproducible procedure with optimal functional and oncological results, a shorter learning curve, greater comfort and vision for surgeons, and a complication rate similar to and even better than reported for open and laparoscopic surgery series. Complications decrease with the learning curve, but surgical team experience continues to be the key factor to achieve better results. SN - 1699-7980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20470715/[Complications_and_incidences_in_our_first_250_robotic_radical_prostatectomies]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/13150775 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -