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Collision type and player anticipation affect head impact severity among youth ice hockey players.
Pediatrics 2010; 125(6):e1394-401Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to determine how body collision type and player anticipation affected the severity of head impacts sustained by young athletes. For anticipated collisions, we sought to evaluate different body position descriptors during delivery and receipt of body collisions and their effects on head impact severity. We hypothesized that head impact biomechanical features would be more severe in unanticipated collisions and open-ice collisions, compared with anticipated collisions and collisions along the playing boards, respectively.

METHODS

Sixteen ice hockey players (age: 14.0 + or - 0.5 years) wore instrumented helmets from which biomechanical measures (ie, linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and severity profile) associated with head impacts were computed. Body collisions observed in video footage captured over a 54-game season were evaluated for collision type (open ice versus along the playing boards), level of anticipation (anticipated versus unanticipated), and relative body positioning by using a new tool developed for this purpose.

RESULTS

Open-ice collisions resulted in greater head linear (P = .036) and rotational (P = .003) accelerations, compared with collisions along the playing boards. Anticipated collisions tended to result in less-severe head impacts than unanticipated collisions, especially for medium-intensity impacts (50th to 75th percentiles of severity scores).

CONCLUSION

Our data underscore the need to provide players with the necessary technical skills to heighten their awareness of imminent collisions and to mitigate the severity of head impacts in this sport.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. jmihalik@email.unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20478933

Citation

Mihalik, Jason P., et al. "Collision Type and Player Anticipation Affect Head Impact Severity Among Youth Ice Hockey Players." Pediatrics, vol. 125, no. 6, 2010, pp. e1394-401.
Mihalik JP, Blackburn JT, Greenwald RM, et al. Collision type and player anticipation affect head impact severity among youth ice hockey players. Pediatrics. 2010;125(6):e1394-401.
Mihalik, J. P., Blackburn, J. T., Greenwald, R. M., Cantu, R. C., Marshall, S. W., & Guskiewicz, K. M. (2010). Collision type and player anticipation affect head impact severity among youth ice hockey players. Pediatrics, 125(6), pp. e1394-401. doi:10.1542/peds.2009-2849.
Mihalik JP, et al. Collision Type and Player Anticipation Affect Head Impact Severity Among Youth Ice Hockey Players. Pediatrics. 2010;125(6):e1394-401. PubMed PMID: 20478933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Collision type and player anticipation affect head impact severity among youth ice hockey players. AU - Mihalik,Jason P, AU - Blackburn,J Troy, AU - Greenwald,Richard M, AU - Cantu,Robert C, AU - Marshall,Stephen W, AU - Guskiewicz,Kevin M, Y1 - 2010/05/17/ PY - 2010/5/19/entrez PY - 2010/5/19/pubmed PY - 2010/7/28/medline SP - e1394 EP - 401 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 125 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine how body collision type and player anticipation affected the severity of head impacts sustained by young athletes. For anticipated collisions, we sought to evaluate different body position descriptors during delivery and receipt of body collisions and their effects on head impact severity. We hypothesized that head impact biomechanical features would be more severe in unanticipated collisions and open-ice collisions, compared with anticipated collisions and collisions along the playing boards, respectively. METHODS: Sixteen ice hockey players (age: 14.0 + or - 0.5 years) wore instrumented helmets from which biomechanical measures (ie, linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and severity profile) associated with head impacts were computed. Body collisions observed in video footage captured over a 54-game season were evaluated for collision type (open ice versus along the playing boards), level of anticipation (anticipated versus unanticipated), and relative body positioning by using a new tool developed for this purpose. RESULTS: Open-ice collisions resulted in greater head linear (P = .036) and rotational (P = .003) accelerations, compared with collisions along the playing boards. Anticipated collisions tended to result in less-severe head impacts than unanticipated collisions, especially for medium-intensity impacts (50th to 75th percentiles of severity scores). CONCLUSION: Our data underscore the need to provide players with the necessary technical skills to heighten their awareness of imminent collisions and to mitigate the severity of head impacts in this sport. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20478933/Collision_type_and_player_anticipation_affect_head_impact_severity_among_youth_ice_hockey_players_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20478933 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -