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Power increases hypocrisy: moralizing in reasoning, immorality in behavior.
Psychol Sci. 2010 May; 21(5):737-44.PS

Abstract

In five studies, we explored whether power increases moral hypocrisy (i.e., imposing strict moral standards on other people but practicing less strict moral behavior oneself). In Experiment 1, compared with the powerless, the powerful condemned other people's cheating more, but also cheated more themselves. In Experiments 2 through 4, the powerful were more strict in judging other people's moral transgressions than in judging their own transgressions. A final study found that the effect of power on moral hypocrisy depends on the legitimacy of the power: When power was illegitimate, the moral-hypocrisy effect was reversed, with the illegitimately powerful becoming stricter in judging their own behavior than in judging other people's behavior. This pattern, which might be dubbed hypercrisy, was also found among low-power participants in Experiments 3 and 4. We discuss how patterns of hypocrisy and hypercrisy among the powerful and powerless can help perpetuate social inequality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tilburg Institute for Behavioral Economics Research (TIBER), Department of Social Psychology, Tilburg University, Warandelaan 2, 5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands. j.lammers@uvt.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20483854

Citation

Lammers, Joris, et al. "Power Increases Hypocrisy: Moralizing in Reasoning, Immorality in Behavior." Psychological Science, vol. 21, no. 5, 2010, pp. 737-44.
Lammers J, Stapel DA, Galinsky AD. Power increases hypocrisy: moralizing in reasoning, immorality in behavior. Psychol Sci. 2010;21(5):737-44.
Lammers, J., Stapel, D. A., & Galinsky, A. D. (2010). Power increases hypocrisy: moralizing in reasoning, immorality in behavior. Psychological Science, 21(5), 737-44. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797610368810
Lammers J, Stapel DA, Galinsky AD. Power Increases Hypocrisy: Moralizing in Reasoning, Immorality in Behavior. Psychol Sci. 2010;21(5):737-44. PubMed PMID: 20483854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Power increases hypocrisy: moralizing in reasoning, immorality in behavior. AU - Lammers,Joris, AU - Stapel,Diederik A, AU - Galinsky,Adam D, Y1 - 2010/04/16/ PY - 2010/5/21/entrez PY - 2010/5/21/pubmed PY - 2010/10/1/medline SP - 737 EP - 44 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - In five studies, we explored whether power increases moral hypocrisy (i.e., imposing strict moral standards on other people but practicing less strict moral behavior oneself). In Experiment 1, compared with the powerless, the powerful condemned other people's cheating more, but also cheated more themselves. In Experiments 2 through 4, the powerful were more strict in judging other people's moral transgressions than in judging their own transgressions. A final study found that the effect of power on moral hypocrisy depends on the legitimacy of the power: When power was illegitimate, the moral-hypocrisy effect was reversed, with the illegitimately powerful becoming stricter in judging their own behavior than in judging other people's behavior. This pattern, which might be dubbed hypercrisy, was also found among low-power participants in Experiments 3 and 4. We discuss how patterns of hypocrisy and hypercrisy among the powerful and powerless can help perpetuate social inequality. SN - 1467-9280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20483854/Power_increases_hypocrisy:_moralizing_in_reasoning_immorality_in_behavior_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0956797610368810?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -