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Exceptional parental longevity associated with lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and memory decline.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL) have a lower rate of dementia than offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS).

DESIGN

Community-based prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Bronx, New York.

PARTICIPANTS

A volunteer sample of 424 community-residing older adults without dementia aged 75 to 85 recruited from Bronx County starting in 1980 and followed for up to 23 years.

MEASUREMENTS

Epidemiological, clinical, and neuropsychological assessments were completed every 12 to 18 months. OPEL were defined as having at least one parent who reached the age of at least 85. OPUS were those for whom neither parent reached the age of 85. Dementia was diagnosed according to case conference consensus based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised, criteria without access to information on parental longevity. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed using established criteria.

RESULTS

Of 424 subjects, 149 (35%) were OPEL, and 275 (65%) were OPUS. Mean age at entry for both groups was 79. The OPEL group had a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease (hazard ratio=0.57, 95% confidence interval=0.35-0.93). After adjusting for sex, education, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, results were essentially unchanged. OPEL also had a significantly lower rate of memory decline on the Selective Reminding Test (SRT) than OPUS (P=.03).

CONCLUSION

OPEL develop dementia and Alzheimer's disease at a significantly lower rate than OPUS. Demographic and medical confounders do not explain this result. Factors associated with longevity may protect against dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Einstein Aging Study, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, USA.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Alzheimer Disease
    Dementia
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Linear Models
    Longevity
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Memory Disorders
    Neuropsychological Tests
    New York City
    Parents
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20487085

    Citation

    Lipton, Richard B., et al. "Exceptional Parental Longevity Associated With Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Decline." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 58, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1043-9.
    Lipton RB, Hirsch J, Katz MJ, et al. Exceptional parental longevity associated with lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and memory decline. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010;58(6):1043-9.
    Lipton, R. B., Hirsch, J., Katz, M. J., Wang, C., Sanders, A. E., Verghese, J., ... Derby, C. A. (2010). Exceptional parental longevity associated with lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and memory decline. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(6), pp. 1043-9. doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02868.x.
    Lipton RB, et al. Exceptional Parental Longevity Associated With Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Decline. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010;58(6):1043-9. PubMed PMID: 20487085.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Exceptional parental longevity associated with lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and memory decline. AU - Lipton,Richard B, AU - Hirsch,Jamie, AU - Katz,Mindy J, AU - Wang,Cuiling, AU - Sanders,Amy E, AU - Verghese,Joe, AU - Barzilai,Nir, AU - Derby,Carol A, Y1 - 2010/05/07/ PY - 2010/5/22/entrez PY - 2010/5/22/pubmed PY - 2010/10/12/medline SP - 1043 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 58 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine whether offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL) have a lower rate of dementia than offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS). DESIGN: Community-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: Bronx, New York. PARTICIPANTS: A volunteer sample of 424 community-residing older adults without dementia aged 75 to 85 recruited from Bronx County starting in 1980 and followed for up to 23 years. MEASUREMENTS: Epidemiological, clinical, and neuropsychological assessments were completed every 12 to 18 months. OPEL were defined as having at least one parent who reached the age of at least 85. OPUS were those for whom neither parent reached the age of 85. Dementia was diagnosed according to case conference consensus based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised, criteria without access to information on parental longevity. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed using established criteria. RESULTS: Of 424 subjects, 149 (35%) were OPEL, and 275 (65%) were OPUS. Mean age at entry for both groups was 79. The OPEL group had a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease (hazard ratio=0.57, 95% confidence interval=0.35-0.93). After adjusting for sex, education, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, results were essentially unchanged. OPEL also had a significantly lower rate of memory decline on the Selective Reminding Test (SRT) than OPUS (P=.03). CONCLUSION: OPEL develop dementia and Alzheimer's disease at a significantly lower rate than OPUS. Demographic and medical confounders do not explain this result. Factors associated with longevity may protect against dementia and Alzheimer's disease. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20487085/Exceptional_parental_longevity_associated_with_lower_risk_of_Alzheimer's_disease_and_memory_decline_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02868.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -