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Opioid antagonism enhances marijuana's effects in heavy marijuana smokers.
Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2010; 211(2):141-8P

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE

Studies in laboratory animals strongly suggest reciprocal modulation of the opioidergic and endocannabinoid systems, a relationship that has not been demonstrated in humans. This study sought to clarify this interaction by assessing how a range of naltrexone doses altered the subjective, cognitive, and cardiovascular effects of marijuana.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Daily marijuana smokers (n = 29) participated in this within-subject, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Naltrexone (0, 12, 25, 50, or 100 mg) was administered before active or inactive marijuana (3.27 or 0% THC) was smoked.

RESULTS

Active marijuana increased subjective ratings of marijuana 'Strength,' 'High,' and positive subjective ratings of marijuana quality and drug effect including 'Liking,' 'Good,' and 'Take Again' compared to inactive marijuana. Naltrexone alone decreased ratings of 'Liking,' 'Take Again,' and 'Stimulated' compared with placebo, but increased ratings of drug 'Strength,' 'High,' 'Good,' 'Liking,' 'Stimulated,' and 'Take Again' when administered under active marijuana conditions. Active marijuana did not affect performance on cognitive tasks relative to inactive marijuana, whereas naltrexone decreased performance when administered alone or in combination with active marijuana. Active marijuana increased heart rate compared to inactive marijuana under placebo naltrexone conditions. Although naltrexone alone decreased heart rate, it further increased marijuana's cardiovascular effect.

CONCLUSIONS

In heavy marijuana smokers opioid-receptor blockade enhanced the subjective and cardiovascular effects of marijuana, suggesting that endogenous opioids dampen cannabinoid effects in this population. These findings demonstrate that a broad range of clinically used doses of naltrexone potentially increases the abuse liability and cardiovascular risks of cannabinoids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division on Substance Abuse, New York Psychiatric Institute and Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 120, New York, NY 10032, USA. zc2160@columbia.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20490465

Citation

Cooper, Ziva D., and Margaret Haney. "Opioid Antagonism Enhances Marijuana's Effects in Heavy Marijuana Smokers." Psychopharmacology, vol. 211, no. 2, 2010, pp. 141-8.
Cooper ZD, Haney M. Opioid antagonism enhances marijuana's effects in heavy marijuana smokers. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010;211(2):141-8.
Cooper, Z. D., & Haney, M. (2010). Opioid antagonism enhances marijuana's effects in heavy marijuana smokers. Psychopharmacology, 211(2), pp. 141-8. doi:10.1007/s00213-010-1875-y.
Cooper ZD, Haney M. Opioid Antagonism Enhances Marijuana's Effects in Heavy Marijuana Smokers. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010;211(2):141-8. PubMed PMID: 20490465.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Opioid antagonism enhances marijuana's effects in heavy marijuana smokers. AU - Cooper,Ziva D, AU - Haney,Margaret, Y1 - 2010/05/19/ PY - 2009/10/07/received PY - 2010/04/23/accepted PY - 2010/5/22/entrez PY - 2010/5/22/pubmed PY - 2010/9/25/medline SP - 141 EP - 8 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) VL - 211 IS - 2 N2 - RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: Studies in laboratory animals strongly suggest reciprocal modulation of the opioidergic and endocannabinoid systems, a relationship that has not been demonstrated in humans. This study sought to clarify this interaction by assessing how a range of naltrexone doses altered the subjective, cognitive, and cardiovascular effects of marijuana. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Daily marijuana smokers (n = 29) participated in this within-subject, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Naltrexone (0, 12, 25, 50, or 100 mg) was administered before active or inactive marijuana (3.27 or 0% THC) was smoked. RESULTS: Active marijuana increased subjective ratings of marijuana 'Strength,' 'High,' and positive subjective ratings of marijuana quality and drug effect including 'Liking,' 'Good,' and 'Take Again' compared to inactive marijuana. Naltrexone alone decreased ratings of 'Liking,' 'Take Again,' and 'Stimulated' compared with placebo, but increased ratings of drug 'Strength,' 'High,' 'Good,' 'Liking,' 'Stimulated,' and 'Take Again' when administered under active marijuana conditions. Active marijuana did not affect performance on cognitive tasks relative to inactive marijuana, whereas naltrexone decreased performance when administered alone or in combination with active marijuana. Active marijuana increased heart rate compared to inactive marijuana under placebo naltrexone conditions. Although naltrexone alone decreased heart rate, it further increased marijuana's cardiovascular effect. CONCLUSIONS: In heavy marijuana smokers opioid-receptor blockade enhanced the subjective and cardiovascular effects of marijuana, suggesting that endogenous opioids dampen cannabinoid effects in this population. These findings demonstrate that a broad range of clinically used doses of naltrexone potentially increases the abuse liability and cardiovascular risks of cannabinoids. SN - 1432-2072 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20490465/abstract/Opioid_antagonism_enhances_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-010-1875-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -