Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Malolactic fermentation as a technique for the deacidification of hard apple cider.
J Food Sci. 2010 Jan-Feb; 75(1):C74-8.JF

Abstract

Malolactic fermentation (MLF), the conversion of malate to lactate, is an important process leading to the deacidification of hard apple cider. MLF is dependent on the levels of inhibitory factors such as sulfur dioxide and ethanol. To assess the effect of these 2 factors on MLF, hard apple cider was produced from pasteurized, unfiltered apple cider (Malus domestica cvs Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Braeburn, and Fuji). Apple cider was treated with 2 levels of sulfur dioxide (50 and 80 ppm) and then fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae montrachet. After the primary fermentation, 1 set of the samples remained unadjusted and 100% ethyl alcohol was used to adjust other sets of samples to 7%, 9%, or 11% (v/v) ethanol. Following the ethanol adjustment, Oenococcus oeni MCW was used to initiate the MLF in half of the samples. Cider parameters monitored throughout the fermentations included organic acid content, titratable acidity, pH, ethanol production, and sugar content. Since samples containing either sulfur dioxide level had similar sugar utilization rates and ethanol production it was concluded that sulfur dioxide had no effect on the primary fermentation. Sulfur dioxide content was shown to have an impact on MLF. There was no difference in the rate of malic acid consumption, but lactic acid production was faster in the 50-ppm sulfur dioxide samples. MLF was not inhibited by ethanol content.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Dept. of Food Science and Technology, 143 Food Industry Complex, Lincoln, NE 68583-0919, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20492153

Citation

Reuss, R M., et al. "Malolactic Fermentation as a Technique for the Deacidification of Hard Apple Cider." Journal of Food Science, vol. 75, no. 1, 2010, pp. C74-8.
Reuss RM, Stratton JE, Smith DA, et al. Malolactic fermentation as a technique for the deacidification of hard apple cider. J Food Sci. 2010;75(1):C74-8.
Reuss, R. M., Stratton, J. E., Smith, D. A., Read, P. E., Cuppett, S. L., & Parkhurst, A. M. (2010). Malolactic fermentation as a technique for the deacidification of hard apple cider. Journal of Food Science, 75(1), C74-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2009.01427.x
Reuss RM, et al. Malolactic Fermentation as a Technique for the Deacidification of Hard Apple Cider. J Food Sci. 2010 Jan-Feb;75(1):C74-8. PubMed PMID: 20492153.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malolactic fermentation as a technique for the deacidification of hard apple cider. AU - Reuss,R M, AU - Stratton,J E, AU - Smith,D A, AU - Read,P E, AU - Cuppett,S L, AU - Parkhurst,A M, PY - 2010/5/25/entrez PY - 2010/5/25/pubmed PY - 2010/9/14/medline SP - C74 EP - 8 JF - Journal of food science JO - J. Food Sci. VL - 75 IS - 1 N2 - Malolactic fermentation (MLF), the conversion of malate to lactate, is an important process leading to the deacidification of hard apple cider. MLF is dependent on the levels of inhibitory factors such as sulfur dioxide and ethanol. To assess the effect of these 2 factors on MLF, hard apple cider was produced from pasteurized, unfiltered apple cider (Malus domestica cvs Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Braeburn, and Fuji). Apple cider was treated with 2 levels of sulfur dioxide (50 and 80 ppm) and then fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae montrachet. After the primary fermentation, 1 set of the samples remained unadjusted and 100% ethyl alcohol was used to adjust other sets of samples to 7%, 9%, or 11% (v/v) ethanol. Following the ethanol adjustment, Oenococcus oeni MCW was used to initiate the MLF in half of the samples. Cider parameters monitored throughout the fermentations included organic acid content, titratable acidity, pH, ethanol production, and sugar content. Since samples containing either sulfur dioxide level had similar sugar utilization rates and ethanol production it was concluded that sulfur dioxide had no effect on the primary fermentation. Sulfur dioxide content was shown to have an impact on MLF. There was no difference in the rate of malic acid consumption, but lactic acid production was faster in the 50-ppm sulfur dioxide samples. MLF was not inhibited by ethanol content. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20492153/Malolactic_fermentation_as_a_technique_for_the_deacidification_of_hard_apple_cider_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2009.01427.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -