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Does choice of imaging modality affect outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar spinal conditions?
J Small Anim Pract. 2010 Jun; 51(6):312-7.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

A retrospective cross-sectional study was done to look for differences in outcome in canine spinal patients that had myelography compared to those that had magnetic resonance imaging.

METHODS

Medical records of dogs with spinal conditions in the period January 2004 to December 2007 were reviewed. Data on patient age, gender, breed, size, neurolocalisation, rate of onset, imaging modality, time taken to image, type of treatment, neurological grade at admission and discharge, length and cost of hospitalisation and status at discharge were collected. Only dogs with neurological grade 3 to 6 with signs referable to the thoracolumbar spine were included.

RESULTS

Of 107 dogs that met the inclusion criteria, 66 (62%) had myelography and 41 (38%) had magnetic resonance imaging. Using multivariable analyses, non-chondrodystrophoid breed, increasing age and higher neurological grade at admission were found to be associated negatively with survival. Neurological grade 5 at admission was found to be associated positively with likelihood of neurological improvement. Male gender, higher neurological grade at admission and medical treatment were associated negatively with length of hospitalisation. magnetic resonance imaging, surgical treatment and period of hospitalisation were associated positively with total cost of hospitalisation.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

No significant association was found between type of imaging and any patient outcome variables except cost of hospitalisation, which was higher for dogs having magnetic resonance imaging. Although magnetic resonance imaging may be considered advantageous compared to myelography because it is non-invasive and provides superior anatomical detail for surgical guidance, no beneficial effect on outcome of dogs with non-ambulatory thoracolumbar spinal disease was found.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20492451

Citation

Parry, A T., et al. "Does Choice of Imaging Modality Affect Outcome in Dogs With Thoracolumbar Spinal Conditions?" The Journal of Small Animal Practice, vol. 51, no. 6, 2010, pp. 312-7.
Parry AT, Harris A, Upjohn MM, et al. Does choice of imaging modality affect outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar spinal conditions? J Small Anim Pract. 2010;51(6):312-7.
Parry, A. T., Harris, A., Upjohn, M. M., Chandler, K., & Lamb, C. R. (2010). Does choice of imaging modality affect outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar spinal conditions? The Journal of Small Animal Practice, 51(6), 312-7. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2010.00936.x
Parry AT, et al. Does Choice of Imaging Modality Affect Outcome in Dogs With Thoracolumbar Spinal Conditions. J Small Anim Pract. 2010;51(6):312-7. PubMed PMID: 20492451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does choice of imaging modality affect outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar spinal conditions? AU - Parry,A T, AU - Harris,A, AU - Upjohn,M M, AU - Chandler,K, AU - Lamb,C R, Y1 - 2010/05/10/ PY - 2010/5/25/entrez PY - 2010/5/25/pubmed PY - 2010/9/29/medline SP - 312 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of small animal practice JO - J Small Anim Pract VL - 51 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: A retrospective cross-sectional study was done to look for differences in outcome in canine spinal patients that had myelography compared to those that had magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: Medical records of dogs with spinal conditions in the period January 2004 to December 2007 were reviewed. Data on patient age, gender, breed, size, neurolocalisation, rate of onset, imaging modality, time taken to image, type of treatment, neurological grade at admission and discharge, length and cost of hospitalisation and status at discharge were collected. Only dogs with neurological grade 3 to 6 with signs referable to the thoracolumbar spine were included. RESULTS: Of 107 dogs that met the inclusion criteria, 66 (62%) had myelography and 41 (38%) had magnetic resonance imaging. Using multivariable analyses, non-chondrodystrophoid breed, increasing age and higher neurological grade at admission were found to be associated negatively with survival. Neurological grade 5 at admission was found to be associated positively with likelihood of neurological improvement. Male gender, higher neurological grade at admission and medical treatment were associated negatively with length of hospitalisation. magnetic resonance imaging, surgical treatment and period of hospitalisation were associated positively with total cost of hospitalisation. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: No significant association was found between type of imaging and any patient outcome variables except cost of hospitalisation, which was higher for dogs having magnetic resonance imaging. Although magnetic resonance imaging may be considered advantageous compared to myelography because it is non-invasive and provides superior anatomical detail for surgical guidance, no beneficial effect on outcome of dogs with non-ambulatory thoracolumbar spinal disease was found. SN - 1748-5827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20492451/Does_choice_of_imaging_modality_affect_outcome_in_dogs_with_thoracolumbar_spinal_conditions L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2010.00936.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -