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Percutaneous nephroscopic surgery.
Korean J Urol. 2010 May; 51(5):298-307.KJ

Abstract

With the development of techniques for percutaneous access and equipment to disintegrate calculi, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery is currently used by many urologists and is the procedure of choice for the removal of large renal calculi and the management of diverticula, intrarenal strictures, and urothelial cancer. Although it is more invasive than shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde ureteroscopic surgery, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery has been successfully performed with high efficiency and low morbidity in difficult renal anatomies and patient conditions. These advantages of minimal invasiveness were rapidly perceived and applied to the management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis, and urothelial cancer. The basic principle of endopyelotomy is a full-thickness incision of the narrow segment followed by prolonged stenting and drainage to allow regeneration of an adequate caliber ureter. The preferred technique for a calyceal diverticulum continues to be debated. Excellent long-term success has been reported with percutaneous, ureteroscopic, and laparoscopic techniques. Each approach is based on the location and size of the diverticulum. So far, percutaneous ablation of the calyceal diverticulum is the most established minimally invasive technique. Infundibular stenosis is an acquired condition usually associated with inflammation or stones. Reported series of percutaneously treated infundibular stenosis are few. In contrast with a calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis is a more difficult entity to treat with only a 50-76% success rate by percutaneous techniques. Currently, percutaneous nephroscopic resection of transitional cell carcinoma in the renal calyx can be applied in indicated cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20495691

Citation

Hwang, Tae-Kon. "Percutaneous Nephroscopic Surgery." Korean Journal of Urology, vol. 51, no. 5, 2010, pp. 298-307.
Hwang TK. Percutaneous nephroscopic surgery. Korean J Urol. 2010;51(5):298-307.
Hwang, T. K. (2010). Percutaneous nephroscopic surgery. Korean Journal of Urology, 51(5), 298-307. https://doi.org/10.4111/kju.2010.51.5.298
Hwang TK. Percutaneous Nephroscopic Surgery. Korean J Urol. 2010;51(5):298-307. PubMed PMID: 20495691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Percutaneous nephroscopic surgery. A1 - Hwang,Tae-Kon, Y1 - 2010/05/19/ PY - 2010/04/25/received PY - 2010/05/04/accepted PY - 2010/5/25/entrez PY - 2010/5/25/pubmed PY - 2010/5/25/medline KW - Diverticulum KW - Hydrocalycosis KW - Percutaneous nephrostomy KW - Transitional cell carcinoma KW - Urinary calculi SP - 298 EP - 307 JF - Korean journal of urology JO - Korean J Urol VL - 51 IS - 5 N2 - With the development of techniques for percutaneous access and equipment to disintegrate calculi, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery is currently used by many urologists and is the procedure of choice for the removal of large renal calculi and the management of diverticula, intrarenal strictures, and urothelial cancer. Although it is more invasive than shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde ureteroscopic surgery, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery has been successfully performed with high efficiency and low morbidity in difficult renal anatomies and patient conditions. These advantages of minimal invasiveness were rapidly perceived and applied to the management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis, and urothelial cancer. The basic principle of endopyelotomy is a full-thickness incision of the narrow segment followed by prolonged stenting and drainage to allow regeneration of an adequate caliber ureter. The preferred technique for a calyceal diverticulum continues to be debated. Excellent long-term success has been reported with percutaneous, ureteroscopic, and laparoscopic techniques. Each approach is based on the location and size of the diverticulum. So far, percutaneous ablation of the calyceal diverticulum is the most established minimally invasive technique. Infundibular stenosis is an acquired condition usually associated with inflammation or stones. Reported series of percutaneously treated infundibular stenosis are few. In contrast with a calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis is a more difficult entity to treat with only a 50-76% success rate by percutaneous techniques. Currently, percutaneous nephroscopic resection of transitional cell carcinoma in the renal calyx can be applied in indicated cases. SN - 2005-6745 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20495691/Percutaneous_nephroscopic_surgery. L2 - https://www.icurology.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4111/kju.2010.51.5.298 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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