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Contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to homocysteine-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in atherosclerotic patients.
Yonsei Med J 2010; 51(4):526-33YM

Abstract

PURPOSE

Elevated circulating oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) levels are associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis, which may be due to high plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and low intakes of antioxidants. We investigated the contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to Hcy-induced LDL oxidation in atherosclerotic patients (AP) and controls.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Male AP (n = 101) who were confirmed by coronary angiography and 91 controls were evaluated by blood biochemistry and dietary intakes. To determine whether homocysteine is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, subjects were divided into three groups; low- (<or= 6.9 uM/L), normal- (7 uM-12 uM/L) and high- (>or= 12.1 uM/L) Hcy.

RESULTS

Plasma levels of homocysteine and LDL were higher, but plasma apo A-I in HDL and folate were lower in the AP group. The odds ratio (OR) for the risk of atherosclerosis was 3.002 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-7.09] for patients in the highest tertile with homocysteine >or= 12.1 uM/L. AP having high homocysteine levels had low intakes of vitamin A, beta-carotene and vitamin C. By logistic regression analysis, age, body mass index (BMI), plasma LDL, plasma folate, and low intakes of vitamin A and beta-carotene were found to be risk factors for atherosclerosis in patients with high-Hcy, but dietary B vitamins including folate were not.

CONCLUSION

A high-Hcy level was a risk factor for atherosclerosis in patients with high Ox-LDL levels. High intakes of antioxidants appeared to be a protective factor for atherosclerosis, perhaps exerting a pro-oxidative effect on LDL when combined with high levels of Hcy and LDL. However, more evidence for the benefits of B vitamins as a homocysteine-lowering therapy is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20499417

Citation

Seo, Hongseog, et al. "Contribution of Dietary Intakes of Antioxidants to Homocysteine-induced Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation in Atherosclerotic Patients." Yonsei Medical Journal, vol. 51, no. 4, 2010, pp. 526-33.
Seo H, Oh H, Park H, et al. Contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to homocysteine-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in atherosclerotic patients. Yonsei Med J. 2010;51(4):526-33.
Seo, H., Oh, H., Park, H., Park, M., Jang, Y., & Lee, M. (2010). Contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to homocysteine-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in atherosclerotic patients. Yonsei Medical Journal, 51(4), pp. 526-33. doi:10.3349/ymj.2010.51.4.526.
Seo H, et al. Contribution of Dietary Intakes of Antioxidants to Homocysteine-induced Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation in Atherosclerotic Patients. Yonsei Med J. 2010;51(4):526-33. PubMed PMID: 20499417.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to homocysteine-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in atherosclerotic patients. AU - Seo,Hongseog, AU - Oh,Hyunhee, AU - Park,Hyesoon, AU - Park,Miyoung, AU - Jang,Yangsoo, AU - Lee,Myoungsook, PY - 2010/5/26/entrez PY - 2010/5/26/pubmed PY - 2010/9/2/medline SP - 526 EP - 33 JF - Yonsei medical journal JO - Yonsei Med. J. VL - 51 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: Elevated circulating oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) levels are associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis, which may be due to high plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and low intakes of antioxidants. We investigated the contribution of dietary intakes of antioxidants to Hcy-induced LDL oxidation in atherosclerotic patients (AP) and controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male AP (n = 101) who were confirmed by coronary angiography and 91 controls were evaluated by blood biochemistry and dietary intakes. To determine whether homocysteine is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, subjects were divided into three groups; low- (<or= 6.9 uM/L), normal- (7 uM-12 uM/L) and high- (>or= 12.1 uM/L) Hcy. RESULTS: Plasma levels of homocysteine and LDL were higher, but plasma apo A-I in HDL and folate were lower in the AP group. The odds ratio (OR) for the risk of atherosclerosis was 3.002 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-7.09] for patients in the highest tertile with homocysteine >or= 12.1 uM/L. AP having high homocysteine levels had low intakes of vitamin A, beta-carotene and vitamin C. By logistic regression analysis, age, body mass index (BMI), plasma LDL, plasma folate, and low intakes of vitamin A and beta-carotene were found to be risk factors for atherosclerosis in patients with high-Hcy, but dietary B vitamins including folate were not. CONCLUSION: A high-Hcy level was a risk factor for atherosclerosis in patients with high Ox-LDL levels. High intakes of antioxidants appeared to be a protective factor for atherosclerosis, perhaps exerting a pro-oxidative effect on LDL when combined with high levels of Hcy and LDL. However, more evidence for the benefits of B vitamins as a homocysteine-lowering therapy is needed. SN - 1976-2437 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20499417/Contribution_of_dietary_intakes_of_antioxidants_to_homocysteine_induced_low_density_lipoprotein__LDL__oxidation_in_atherosclerotic_patients_ L2 - https://www.eymj.org/DOIx.php?id=10.3349/ymj.2010.51.4.526 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -