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Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2010; 19(6):1612-22CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To date, cigarette smoking is the most consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. We prospectively examined the role of active cigarette smoking, smoking cessation, and passive smoking as determinants for pancreatic cancer.

METHODS

The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852 men and women who completed a baseline questionnaire in 1986. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 520 incident pancreatic cancer cases were available for analysis. A case-cohort approach was employed using the person-years of follow-up of a random subcohort (n = 5,000), which was chosen immediately after baseline.

RESULTS

Compared with never cigarette smokers, both former and current cigarette smokers had an increased pancreatic cancer risk [multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio (HR), 1.34; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.75 and HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.38, respectively]. We observed an increased pancreatic cancer risk per increment of 10 years of smoking (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.08-1.22) and an HR of 1.08 per increment of 10 cigarettes/d (95% CI, 0.98-1.19). Quitting smoking gradually reduced pancreatic cancer risk and approached unity after > or = 20 years of quitting. No association was observed for passive smoking exposure and pancreatic cancer risk in women; in men, this association was not investigated because >90% of the men were ever smokers.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, our findings confirmed that cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer, whereas quitting smoking reduced risk. No association was observed between passive smoking exposure and pancreatic cancer risk in women.

IMPACT

Quitting smoking would benefit the burden on pancreatic cancer incidence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. mirjam.heinen@epid.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20501775

Citation

Heinen, Mirjam M., et al. "Active and Passive Smoking and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 19, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1612-22.
Heinen MM, Verhage BA, Goldbohm RA, et al. Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(6):1612-22.
Heinen, M. M., Verhage, B. A., Goldbohm, R. A., & van den Brandt, P. A. (2010). Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 19(6), pp. 1612-22. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0121.
Heinen MM, et al. Active and Passive Smoking and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(6):1612-22. PubMed PMID: 20501775.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study. AU - Heinen,Mirjam M, AU - Verhage,Bas A J, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, Y1 - 2010/05/25/ PY - 2010/5/27/entrez PY - 2010/5/27/pubmed PY - 2010/10/16/medline SP - 1612 EP - 22 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 19 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: To date, cigarette smoking is the most consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. We prospectively examined the role of active cigarette smoking, smoking cessation, and passive smoking as determinants for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852 men and women who completed a baseline questionnaire in 1986. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 520 incident pancreatic cancer cases were available for analysis. A case-cohort approach was employed using the person-years of follow-up of a random subcohort (n = 5,000), which was chosen immediately after baseline. RESULTS: Compared with never cigarette smokers, both former and current cigarette smokers had an increased pancreatic cancer risk [multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio (HR), 1.34; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.75 and HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.38, respectively]. We observed an increased pancreatic cancer risk per increment of 10 years of smoking (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.08-1.22) and an HR of 1.08 per increment of 10 cigarettes/d (95% CI, 0.98-1.19). Quitting smoking gradually reduced pancreatic cancer risk and approached unity after > or = 20 years of quitting. No association was observed for passive smoking exposure and pancreatic cancer risk in women; in men, this association was not investigated because >90% of the men were ever smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings confirmed that cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer, whereas quitting smoking reduced risk. No association was observed between passive smoking exposure and pancreatic cancer risk in women. IMPACT: Quitting smoking would benefit the burden on pancreatic cancer incidence. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20501775/Active_and_passive_smoking_and_the_risk_of_pancreatic_cancer_in_the_Netherlands_Cohort_Study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20501775 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -