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Childhood victimization and crime victimization.
J Interpers Violence. 2011 Mar; 26(4):640-63.JI

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine whether abused and neglected children are at increased risk for subsequent crime victimization. We ask four basic questions: (a) Does a history of child abuse/neglect increase one's risk of physical, sexual, and property crime victimization? (b) Do lifestyle characteristics (prostitution, running away, homelessness, criminal history, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse) increase a person's risk for crime victimization? (c) Do lifestyle characteristics mediate the relationship between child abuse/ neglect and crime victimization? (d) Do these relationships vary by a person's sex or race/ethnicity? Using data from a prospective cohort design study, children with documented histories of physical and sexual abuse and/or neglect (n = 497) were matched with nonabused and nonneglected children (n = 395), followed up, and interviewed in middle adulthood (approximate age 39.5). Logistic and ordinary least square regressions were conducted to assess risk for crime victimization and test for mediation. Child abuse and/ or neglect increased a person's risk for physical (OR = 2.56, p < .001) and sexual (OR = 2.28, p < .001) but not for property crime victimization. For the sample overall, running away served as a partial mediator between child abuse and neglect and physical and sexual crime victimization. In addition, results revealed sex and race/ethnicity differences in patterns of mediation. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY 10019, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20505112

Citation

McIntyre, Jared Kean, and Cathy Spatz Widom. "Childhood Victimization and Crime Victimization." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 26, no. 4, 2011, pp. 640-63.
McIntyre JK, Widom CS. Childhood victimization and crime victimization. J Interpers Violence. 2011;26(4):640-63.
McIntyre, J. K., & Widom, C. S. (2011). Childhood victimization and crime victimization. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 26(4), 640-63. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260510365868
McIntyre JK, Widom CS. Childhood Victimization and Crime Victimization. J Interpers Violence. 2011;26(4):640-63. PubMed PMID: 20505112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood victimization and crime victimization. AU - McIntyre,Jared Kean, AU - Widom,Cathy Spatz, Y1 - 2010/05/26/ PY - 2010/5/28/entrez PY - 2010/5/28/pubmed PY - 2011/6/28/medline SP - 640 EP - 63 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - The purpose of this study is to determine whether abused and neglected children are at increased risk for subsequent crime victimization. We ask four basic questions: (a) Does a history of child abuse/neglect increase one's risk of physical, sexual, and property crime victimization? (b) Do lifestyle characteristics (prostitution, running away, homelessness, criminal history, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse) increase a person's risk for crime victimization? (c) Do lifestyle characteristics mediate the relationship between child abuse/ neglect and crime victimization? (d) Do these relationships vary by a person's sex or race/ethnicity? Using data from a prospective cohort design study, children with documented histories of physical and sexual abuse and/or neglect (n = 497) were matched with nonabused and nonneglected children (n = 395), followed up, and interviewed in middle adulthood (approximate age 39.5). Logistic and ordinary least square regressions were conducted to assess risk for crime victimization and test for mediation. Child abuse and/ or neglect increased a person's risk for physical (OR = 2.56, p < .001) and sexual (OR = 2.28, p < .001) but not for property crime victimization. For the sample overall, running away served as a partial mediator between child abuse and neglect and physical and sexual crime victimization. In addition, results revealed sex and race/ethnicity differences in patterns of mediation. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20505112/Childhood_victimization_and_crime_victimization_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260510365868?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -