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Clinical and epidemiological studies on the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani in Sri Lanka.
Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 2010 Apr; 104(3):213-23.AT

Abstract

Sri Lanka is the newest reported focus of human leishmaniasis within the Indian subcontinent. Over the last 8 years, more than 2000 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), apparently caused by Leishmania donovani (a species usually associated with the visceral form of the disease), have been passively identified in the country. The clinical profiles of 401 suspected cases of CL in Sri Lanka were recently explored and some of the cases' immunological responses were investigated, in antibody-detection assays based on the rk39 antigen. These studies were followed by cross-sectional surveys, involving active case detection, in three areas of Sri Lanka, two of them known to be at relatively high risk for CL, with the aims of estimating the local prevalences of the disease and identifying the main risk factors for its acquisition. This appears to be the first detailed report on the prevalence, risk factors and human serological response associated with human leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. Although the data collected indicated that the transmission of the parasite causing CL was mostly outdoor (and possibly zoonotic) in the north of the country, most of the transmission in the south seemed to be peridomestic. The CL was found to affect a wide age range, in both male and female subjects. Curiously, the 24 cases of CL that were investigated in the rk39 assays gave negative results whereas the single cases of mucosal or visceral leishmaniasis that were studied were found positive for antibodies reacting with the rk39 antigen. More programmes of active case detection need to be launched across Sri Lanka before the true national burden posed by human leishmaniasis can be accurately evaluated. General awareness of leishmaniasis needs to be raised. Hopefully, continued research and disease monitoring will allow the effective control of leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo 08, Sri Lanka. yayureka@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20507695

Citation

Siriwardana, H V Y D., et al. "Clinical and Epidemiological Studies On the Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused By Leishmania (Leishmania) Donovani in Sri Lanka." Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, vol. 104, no. 3, 2010, pp. 213-23.
Siriwardana HV, Thalagala N, Karunaweera ND. Clinical and epidemiological studies on the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani in Sri Lanka. Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 2010;104(3):213-23.
Siriwardana, H. V., Thalagala, N., & Karunaweera, N. D. (2010). Clinical and epidemiological studies on the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani in Sri Lanka. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, 104(3), 213-23. https://doi.org/10.1179/136485910X12647085215615
Siriwardana HV, Thalagala N, Karunaweera ND. Clinical and Epidemiological Studies On the Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused By Leishmania (Leishmania) Donovani in Sri Lanka. Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 2010;104(3):213-23. PubMed PMID: 20507695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical and epidemiological studies on the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani in Sri Lanka. AU - Siriwardana,H V Y D, AU - Thalagala,N, AU - Karunaweera,N D, PY - 2010/5/29/entrez PY - 2010/5/29/pubmed PY - 2010/9/21/medline SP - 213 EP - 23 JF - Annals of tropical medicine and parasitology JO - Ann Trop Med Parasitol VL - 104 IS - 3 N2 - Sri Lanka is the newest reported focus of human leishmaniasis within the Indian subcontinent. Over the last 8 years, more than 2000 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), apparently caused by Leishmania donovani (a species usually associated with the visceral form of the disease), have been passively identified in the country. The clinical profiles of 401 suspected cases of CL in Sri Lanka were recently explored and some of the cases' immunological responses were investigated, in antibody-detection assays based on the rk39 antigen. These studies were followed by cross-sectional surveys, involving active case detection, in three areas of Sri Lanka, two of them known to be at relatively high risk for CL, with the aims of estimating the local prevalences of the disease and identifying the main risk factors for its acquisition. This appears to be the first detailed report on the prevalence, risk factors and human serological response associated with human leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. Although the data collected indicated that the transmission of the parasite causing CL was mostly outdoor (and possibly zoonotic) in the north of the country, most of the transmission in the south seemed to be peridomestic. The CL was found to affect a wide age range, in both male and female subjects. Curiously, the 24 cases of CL that were investigated in the rk39 assays gave negative results whereas the single cases of mucosal or visceral leishmaniasis that were studied were found positive for antibodies reacting with the rk39 antigen. More programmes of active case detection need to be launched across Sri Lanka before the true national burden posed by human leishmaniasis can be accurately evaluated. General awareness of leishmaniasis needs to be raised. Hopefully, continued research and disease monitoring will allow the effective control of leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. SN - 1364-8594 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20507695/Clinical_and_epidemiological_studies_on_the_cutaneous_leishmaniasis_caused_by_Leishmania__Leishmania__donovani_in_Sri_Lanka_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4166 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -