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Morphed emotional faces: emotion detection and misinterpretation in social anxiety.
J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2010 Dec; 41(4):418-25.JB

Abstract

The current study investigated detection and interpretation of emotional facial expressions in high socially anxious (HSA) individuals compared to non-anxious controls (NAC). A version of the morphed faces task was implemented to assess emotion onset perception, decoding accuracy and interpretation, either with time pressure (Restricted Viewing Task, RVT) or with unlimited viewing (Free Viewing Task, FVT). Twenty-seven HSA and 30 NAC viewed sequences of neutral faces slowly changing to full-intensity angry, happy, or disgust expressions. Participants were instructed to assign the expression as soon as possible to one of four given emotion categories (angry, contempt, disgust, or happy). While no group differences were found for emotion onset perception or decoding performance, the results suggest an interpretation bias in HSA. Under the RVT condition, HSA demonstrated a threat bias (disgust interpreted as contempt), contrasting the NAC's positive bias (disgust interpreted as happy). No group differences were found in the FVT. We suggest that socially anxious individuals tend to misinterpret facial expressions as threatening when they must do so quickly and efficiently, as in real life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for General Psychology Biopsychology and Methods of Psychology, Faculty of Science, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany. heuer@psychologie.tu-dresden.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20511123

Citation

Heuer, Kathrin, et al. "Morphed Emotional Faces: Emotion Detection and Misinterpretation in Social Anxiety." Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, vol. 41, no. 4, 2010, pp. 418-25.
Heuer K, Lange WG, Isaac L, et al. Morphed emotional faces: emotion detection and misinterpretation in social anxiety. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2010;41(4):418-25.
Heuer, K., Lange, W. G., Isaac, L., Rinck, M., & Becker, E. S. (2010). Morphed emotional faces: emotion detection and misinterpretation in social anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 41(4), 418-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2010.04.005
Heuer K, et al. Morphed Emotional Faces: Emotion Detection and Misinterpretation in Social Anxiety. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2010;41(4):418-25. PubMed PMID: 20511123.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Morphed emotional faces: emotion detection and misinterpretation in social anxiety. AU - Heuer,Kathrin, AU - Lange,Wolf-Gero, AU - Isaac,Linda, AU - Rinck,Mike, AU - Becker,Eni S, Y1 - 2010/05/06/ PY - 2009/09/17/received PY - 2010/04/16/revised PY - 2010/04/26/accepted PY - 2010/6/1/entrez PY - 2010/6/1/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 418 EP - 25 JF - Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry JO - J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry VL - 41 IS - 4 N2 - The current study investigated detection and interpretation of emotional facial expressions in high socially anxious (HSA) individuals compared to non-anxious controls (NAC). A version of the morphed faces task was implemented to assess emotion onset perception, decoding accuracy and interpretation, either with time pressure (Restricted Viewing Task, RVT) or with unlimited viewing (Free Viewing Task, FVT). Twenty-seven HSA and 30 NAC viewed sequences of neutral faces slowly changing to full-intensity angry, happy, or disgust expressions. Participants were instructed to assign the expression as soon as possible to one of four given emotion categories (angry, contempt, disgust, or happy). While no group differences were found for emotion onset perception or decoding performance, the results suggest an interpretation bias in HSA. Under the RVT condition, HSA demonstrated a threat bias (disgust interpreted as contempt), contrasting the NAC's positive bias (disgust interpreted as happy). No group differences were found in the FVT. We suggest that socially anxious individuals tend to misinterpret facial expressions as threatening when they must do so quickly and efficiently, as in real life. SN - 1873-7943 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20511123/Morphed_emotional_faces:_emotion_detection_and_misinterpretation_in_social_anxiety_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005-7916(10)00055-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -