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Diurnal variation in Wingate test performances: influence of active warm-up.
Chronobiol Int 2010; 27(3):640-52CI

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of active warm-up duration on the diurnal fluctuations in anaerobic performances. Twelve physical education students performed a medical stress test (progressive test up to exhaustion) and four Wingate tests (measurement of peak power [P(peak)], mean power [P(mean)], and fatigue index during an all-out 30 s cycling exercise). The tests were performed in separate sessions (minimum interval = 36 h) in a balanced and randomized design at 08:00 and 18:00 h, either after a 5 min (5-AWU) or a 15 min active warm-up (15-AWU). AWU consisted of pedaling at 50% of the power output at the last stage of the stress exhausting test. Rectal temperature was collected throughout the sessions. A two-way ANOVA (warm-up x time of day) revealed a significant interaction for P(peak) (F((1.11)) = 6.48, p < 0.05) and P(mean) (F((1.11)) = 5.84, p < 0.05): the time-of-day effect was significant (p < 0.001) in contrast with the effect of warm-up duration (p > 0.05). P(peak) and P(mean) improved significantly from morning to afternoon after both 5-AWU and 15-AWU, but the effect of warm-up duration was significant in the morning only. Indeed, the values of P(peak) or P(mean) were the same after both warm-up protocols in the afternoon. For rectal temperature, there was no interaction between time-of-day and warm-up duration. Rectal temperature before and after both the warm-up protocols was higher in the afternoon, and the effect of warm-up duration on temperature was similar at 08:00 and 18:00 h. In conclusion, the interpretation of the results of the anaerobic performance tests should take into account time-of-day and warm-up procedures. Longer warm-up protocols are recommended in the morning to minimize the diurnal fluctuations of anaerobic performances.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Laboratory Sports Performance Optimizaion, National Centre of Medicine and Science in Sport, Tunis, Tunisia. n_souissi@yahoo.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20524806

Citation

Souissi, Nizar, et al. "Diurnal Variation in Wingate Test Performances: Influence of Active Warm-up." Chronobiology International, vol. 27, no. 3, 2010, pp. 640-52.
Souissi N, Driss T, Chamari K, et al. Diurnal variation in Wingate test performances: influence of active warm-up. Chronobiol Int. 2010;27(3):640-52.
Souissi, N., Driss, T., Chamari, K., Vandewalle, H., Davenne, D., Gam, A., ... Jousselin, E. (2010). Diurnal variation in Wingate test performances: influence of active warm-up. Chronobiology International, 27(3), pp. 640-52. doi:10.3109/07420528.2010.483157.
Souissi N, et al. Diurnal Variation in Wingate Test Performances: Influence of Active Warm-up. Chronobiol Int. 2010;27(3):640-52. PubMed PMID: 20524806.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diurnal variation in Wingate test performances: influence of active warm-up. AU - Souissi,Nizar, AU - Driss,Tarak, AU - Chamari,Karim, AU - Vandewalle,Henry, AU - Davenne,Damien, AU - Gam,Abdelkader, AU - Fillard,Jean-Robert, AU - Jousselin,Eric, PY - 2010/6/8/entrez PY - 2010/6/9/pubmed PY - 2010/9/11/medline SP - 640 EP - 52 JF - Chronobiology international JO - Chronobiol. Int. VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of active warm-up duration on the diurnal fluctuations in anaerobic performances. Twelve physical education students performed a medical stress test (progressive test up to exhaustion) and four Wingate tests (measurement of peak power [P(peak)], mean power [P(mean)], and fatigue index during an all-out 30 s cycling exercise). The tests were performed in separate sessions (minimum interval = 36 h) in a balanced and randomized design at 08:00 and 18:00 h, either after a 5 min (5-AWU) or a 15 min active warm-up (15-AWU). AWU consisted of pedaling at 50% of the power output at the last stage of the stress exhausting test. Rectal temperature was collected throughout the sessions. A two-way ANOVA (warm-up x time of day) revealed a significant interaction for P(peak) (F((1.11)) = 6.48, p < 0.05) and P(mean) (F((1.11)) = 5.84, p < 0.05): the time-of-day effect was significant (p < 0.001) in contrast with the effect of warm-up duration (p > 0.05). P(peak) and P(mean) improved significantly from morning to afternoon after both 5-AWU and 15-AWU, but the effect of warm-up duration was significant in the morning only. Indeed, the values of P(peak) or P(mean) were the same after both warm-up protocols in the afternoon. For rectal temperature, there was no interaction between time-of-day and warm-up duration. Rectal temperature before and after both the warm-up protocols was higher in the afternoon, and the effect of warm-up duration on temperature was similar at 08:00 and 18:00 h. In conclusion, the interpretation of the results of the anaerobic performance tests should take into account time-of-day and warm-up procedures. Longer warm-up protocols are recommended in the morning to minimize the diurnal fluctuations of anaerobic performances. SN - 1525-6073 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20524806/Diurnal_variation_in_Wingate_test_performances:_influence_of_active_warm_up_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/07420528.2010.483157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -