Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nutritional rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children and adolescents.
Pediatr Endocrinol Rev 2010 Mar-Apr; 7(3):283-91PE

Abstract

Nutritional rickets continues to be a public health problem in many countries despite the presence of cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. Deficiency of vitamin D is associated with rickets in growing children and osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D deficiency is attributed to a variety of causes including diet, atmospheric pollution, religious practices that restrict sunlight exposure (clothing), geographic latitude and altitude, season, and time of the day. The clinical findings of rickets can vary among stages of the disease. It is recommended that healthy infants, children and adolescents take at least 400 IU vitamin D per day to prevent rickets and vitamin D deficiency. Pediatricians and other healthcare professionals should try to ensure that children and adolescents receive daily vitamin D requirements appropriate for their risk factors, traditions, and customs. Additionally, it is important to use every opportunity to ensure that effective preventive strategies are put in practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20526242

Citation

Unuvar, Tolga, and Atilla Buyukgebiz. "Nutritional Rickets and Vitamin D Deficiency in Infants, Children and Adolescents." Pediatric Endocrinology Reviews : PER, vol. 7, no. 3, 2010, pp. 283-91.
Unuvar T, Buyukgebiz A. Nutritional rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children and adolescents. Pediatr Endocrinol Rev. 2010;7(3):283-91.
Unuvar, T., & Buyukgebiz, A. (2010). Nutritional rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children and adolescents. Pediatric Endocrinology Reviews : PER, 7(3), pp. 283-91.
Unuvar T, Buyukgebiz A. Nutritional Rickets and Vitamin D Deficiency in Infants, Children and Adolescents. Pediatr Endocrinol Rev. 2010;7(3):283-91. PubMed PMID: 20526242.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children and adolescents. AU - Unuvar,Tolga, AU - Buyukgebiz,Atilla, PY - 2010/6/8/entrez PY - 2010/6/9/pubmed PY - 2010/8/21/medline SP - 283 EP - 91 JF - Pediatric endocrinology reviews : PER JO - Pediatr Endocrinol Rev VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - Nutritional rickets continues to be a public health problem in many countries despite the presence of cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. Deficiency of vitamin D is associated with rickets in growing children and osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D deficiency is attributed to a variety of causes including diet, atmospheric pollution, religious practices that restrict sunlight exposure (clothing), geographic latitude and altitude, season, and time of the day. The clinical findings of rickets can vary among stages of the disease. It is recommended that healthy infants, children and adolescents take at least 400 IU vitamin D per day to prevent rickets and vitamin D deficiency. Pediatricians and other healthcare professionals should try to ensure that children and adolescents receive daily vitamin D requirements appropriate for their risk factors, traditions, and customs. Additionally, it is important to use every opportunity to ensure that effective preventive strategies are put in practice. SN - 1565-4753 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20526242/Nutritional_rickets_and_vitamin_D_deficiency_in_infants_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=20526242 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -