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The body mass index as a prognostic factor of critical care.
Korean J Intern Med. 2010 Jun; 25(2):162-7.KJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Obesity is a worldwide concern, but its influence on critical care outcomes is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal body mass index (BMI) would be an independent predictor of higher mortality rates in intensive care unit (ICU).

METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed patients who had admitted to the ICU from January 2007 to December 2007. Admission BMI was analyzed as both a three categorical (underweight, < 18.5 kg/m(2); normal weight, 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2); overweight and obese, > or = 25 kg/m(2)) and continuous variables among all patients with an ICU length of stay > or = 4 days. The primary outcome was ICU mortality.

RESULTS

The multivariate analysis on ICU mortality selected Mortality Prediction Model-Admission (MPM at time zero) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.024; p = 0.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.010 to 1.037), failed extubation (HR, 5.092; p = 0.0001; 95% CI, 2.742 to 9.456) as significant risk factors. When controlling these variables, none of the BMI group and BMI as a continuous variable had an independent association with ICU mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

BMI did not have a significant influence on ICU mortality. The ICU mortality was influenced more strongly by severity of illness and failed extubation rather than BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20526389

Citation

Lim, So Yeon, et al. "The Body Mass Index as a Prognostic Factor of Critical Care." The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 25, no. 2, 2010, pp. 162-7.
Lim SY, Kim SI, Ryu YJ, et al. The body mass index as a prognostic factor of critical care. Korean J Intern Med. 2010;25(2):162-7.
Lim, S. Y., Kim, S. I., Ryu, Y. J., Lee, J. H., Chun, E. M., & Chang, J. H. (2010). The body mass index as a prognostic factor of critical care. The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine, 25(2), 162-7. https://doi.org/10.3904/kjim.2010.25.2.162
Lim SY, et al. The Body Mass Index as a Prognostic Factor of Critical Care. Korean J Intern Med. 2010;25(2):162-7. PubMed PMID: 20526389.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The body mass index as a prognostic factor of critical care. AU - Lim,So Yeon, AU - Kim,So I, AU - Ryu,Yon Ju, AU - Lee,Jin Hwa, AU - Chun,Eun Mi, AU - Chang,Jung Hyun, Y1 - 2010/06/01/ PY - 2009/06/25/received PY - 2009/10/20/accepted PY - 2010/6/8/entrez PY - 2010/6/9/pubmed PY - 2010/7/27/medline KW - BMI KW - Intensive care unit KW - Mortality KW - Obesity SP - 162 EP - 7 JF - The Korean journal of internal medicine JO - Korean J Intern Med VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Obesity is a worldwide concern, but its influence on critical care outcomes is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal body mass index (BMI) would be an independent predictor of higher mortality rates in intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients who had admitted to the ICU from January 2007 to December 2007. Admission BMI was analyzed as both a three categorical (underweight, < 18.5 kg/m(2); normal weight, 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2); overweight and obese, > or = 25 kg/m(2)) and continuous variables among all patients with an ICU length of stay > or = 4 days. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. RESULTS: The multivariate analysis on ICU mortality selected Mortality Prediction Model-Admission (MPM at time zero) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.024; p = 0.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.010 to 1.037), failed extubation (HR, 5.092; p = 0.0001; 95% CI, 2.742 to 9.456) as significant risk factors. When controlling these variables, none of the BMI group and BMI as a continuous variable had an independent association with ICU mortality. CONCLUSIONS: BMI did not have a significant influence on ICU mortality. The ICU mortality was influenced more strongly by severity of illness and failed extubation rather than BMI. SN - 1226-3303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20526389/The_body_mass_index_as_a_prognostic_factor_of_critical_care_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3904/kjim.2010.25.2.162 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -