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Fatness, fitness, and increased cardiovascular risk in young children.
J Pediatr. 2010 Oct; 157(4):552-8.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity among young children, and their influence on a comprehensive cardiovascular risk profile.

STUDY DESIGN

The sample included 95 healthy weight, 54 overweight, and 31 obese children (n=180, 10.9+/-2.1 years). All children had a medical assessment that included a physical examination and fasting investigations including glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, insulin and glucose levels. Body mass index and waist circumference z-scores were calculated. Children's fitness level was measured with the Queens College step test.

RESULTS

Although low fitness was independently associated with cardiovascular risk, multi-level analysis demonstrated that waist circumference z-score was the only significant predictor of cardiovascular risk factors including SBP (beta=3.29, P<.001), DBP (beta=1.88, P<.005), high-density lipoprotein (beta=-0.12, P<.001), and triglyceride levels (beta=0.14, p<.001), fasting insulin (beta=2.83, P<.001), C-peptide (beta=0.11, P<.001), and HOMA-IR (beta=0.34, P<.001), with increasing waist circumference z-score associated with increasing cardiovascular risk. Within the healthy weight children, high fitness was associated with significantly reduced triglyceride levels, and lower fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR.

CONCLUSIONS

Young children's health may be influenced more by body fatness, and in particular, the distribution of body fat than by cardiorespiratory fitness. However, within the healthy weight children, high fitness was associated with a favorable metabolic profile, suggesting that cardiorespiratory fitness may exert a protective effect on metabolic risk in children whose risk is not confounded by fatness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research Centre for Child Health Research, School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Princess Margaret Hospital, West Perth, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20542285

Citation

Suriano, Katie, et al. "Fatness, Fitness, and Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Young Children." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 157, no. 4, 2010, pp. 552-8.
Suriano K, Curran J, Byrne SM, et al. Fatness, fitness, and increased cardiovascular risk in young children. J Pediatr. 2010;157(4):552-8.
Suriano, K., Curran, J., Byrne, S. M., Jones, T. W., & Davis, E. A. (2010). Fatness, fitness, and increased cardiovascular risk in young children. The Journal of Pediatrics, 157(4), 552-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.04.042
Suriano K, et al. Fatness, Fitness, and Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Young Children. J Pediatr. 2010;157(4):552-8. PubMed PMID: 20542285.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatness, fitness, and increased cardiovascular risk in young children. AU - Suriano,Katie, AU - Curran,Jacqueline, AU - Byrne,Susan M, AU - Jones,Timothy W, AU - Davis,Elizabeth A, Y1 - 2010/06/12/ PY - 2009/07/17/received PY - 2010/03/17/revised PY - 2010/04/23/accepted PY - 2010/6/15/entrez PY - 2010/6/15/pubmed PY - 2010/10/12/medline SP - 552 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 157 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity among young children, and their influence on a comprehensive cardiovascular risk profile. STUDY DESIGN: The sample included 95 healthy weight, 54 overweight, and 31 obese children (n=180, 10.9+/-2.1 years). All children had a medical assessment that included a physical examination and fasting investigations including glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, insulin and glucose levels. Body mass index and waist circumference z-scores were calculated. Children's fitness level was measured with the Queens College step test. RESULTS: Although low fitness was independently associated with cardiovascular risk, multi-level analysis demonstrated that waist circumference z-score was the only significant predictor of cardiovascular risk factors including SBP (beta=3.29, P<.001), DBP (beta=1.88, P<.005), high-density lipoprotein (beta=-0.12, P<.001), and triglyceride levels (beta=0.14, p<.001), fasting insulin (beta=2.83, P<.001), C-peptide (beta=0.11, P<.001), and HOMA-IR (beta=0.34, P<.001), with increasing waist circumference z-score associated with increasing cardiovascular risk. Within the healthy weight children, high fitness was associated with significantly reduced triglyceride levels, and lower fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR. CONCLUSIONS: Young children's health may be influenced more by body fatness, and in particular, the distribution of body fat than by cardiorespiratory fitness. However, within the healthy weight children, high fitness was associated with a favorable metabolic profile, suggesting that cardiorespiratory fitness may exert a protective effect on metabolic risk in children whose risk is not confounded by fatness. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20542285/Fatness_fitness_and_increased_cardiovascular_risk_in_young_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(10)00342-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -