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Male circumcision to reduce sexual transmission of HIV.
Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 2010 Jul; 5(4):344-9.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Three large trials among African heterosexual men in the last decade have confirmed that male circumcision reduces HIV acquisition. This review summarizes recent data regarding circumcision performed primarily to reduce HIV in high-prevalence settings.

RECENT FINDINGS

Male circumcision more than halved the acquisition of HIV in the trials, and was associated with few adverse events and high levels of satisfaction. An additional trial found no direct reduction in HIV risk for female partners of circumcised men. Evidence for an HIV-protective effect of circumcision in men who have sex with men is weak and inconclusive. Acquisition of HSV-2 and high-risk human papillomavirus are both reduced in circumcised heterosexual men, whereas acquisition of common male urethral pathogens are not. Concerns exist that behavioural disinhibition could offset benefits of this intervention, and it remains to be seen whether the low rate of adverse events and adoption of safer sexual practices observed in the trials will be maintained in circumcision programmes outside trial settings.

SUMMARY

The evidence that circumcision reduces HIV in African heterosexual men is clear. The impedance of political, cultural and logistic factors on expansion of much-needed African circumcision services requires urgent attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, University of New South Wales, Australia. dtempleton@nchecr.unsw.edu.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20543611

Citation

Templeton, David J.. "Male Circumcision to Reduce Sexual Transmission of HIV." Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS, vol. 5, no. 4, 2010, pp. 344-9.
Templeton DJ. Male circumcision to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 2010;5(4):344-9.
Templeton, D. J. (2010). Male circumcision to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS, 5(4), 344-9. https://doi.org/10.1097/COH.0b013e32833a46d3
Templeton DJ. Male Circumcision to Reduce Sexual Transmission of HIV. Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 2010;5(4):344-9. PubMed PMID: 20543611.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Male circumcision to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. A1 - Templeton,David J, PY - 2010/6/15/entrez PY - 2010/6/15/pubmed PY - 2010/9/16/medline SP - 344 EP - 9 JF - Current opinion in HIV and AIDS JO - Curr Opin HIV AIDS VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Three large trials among African heterosexual men in the last decade have confirmed that male circumcision reduces HIV acquisition. This review summarizes recent data regarding circumcision performed primarily to reduce HIV in high-prevalence settings. RECENT FINDINGS: Male circumcision more than halved the acquisition of HIV in the trials, and was associated with few adverse events and high levels of satisfaction. An additional trial found no direct reduction in HIV risk for female partners of circumcised men. Evidence for an HIV-protective effect of circumcision in men who have sex with men is weak and inconclusive. Acquisition of HSV-2 and high-risk human papillomavirus are both reduced in circumcised heterosexual men, whereas acquisition of common male urethral pathogens are not. Concerns exist that behavioural disinhibition could offset benefits of this intervention, and it remains to be seen whether the low rate of adverse events and adoption of safer sexual practices observed in the trials will be maintained in circumcision programmes outside trial settings. SUMMARY: The evidence that circumcision reduces HIV in African heterosexual men is clear. The impedance of political, cultural and logistic factors on expansion of much-needed African circumcision services requires urgent attention. SN - 1746-6318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20543611/Male_circumcision_to_reduce_sexual_transmission_of_HIV_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/COH.0b013e32833a46d3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -