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Gender, topic, and time in observed demand-withdraw interaction in cross- and same-sex couples.
J Fam Psychol. 2010 Jun; 24(3):233-42.JF

Abstract

The demand-withdraw interaction pattern has been extensively studied and consistently linked to relationship quality in cross-sex relationships, but it has received little study using observational data in same-sex relationships. Demand-withdraw behavior, which occurs when 1 partner makes a complaint or request for a change and the other partner avoids the request or withdraws from the discussion (Christensen, 1988), was observationally coded in the problem-solving interactions of 75 (20 unmarried lesbian, 15 unmarried gay male, 20 unmarried straight cohabiting, and 20 married straight) couples. Results revealed that same- and cross-sex couples engage in demanding and withdrawing behaviors in highly similar ways. For all couples, partners demanded at a higher level during their own issue than during their partner's issue, and withdrew at a higher level during their partner's issue than during their own issue. Women demanded at higher levels than men, and men withdrew at higher levels than women. All partners were more likely to be in a demanding role during their own topic than during their partner's topic. Polarization was greater in woman-selected than in man-selected topics. Demanding increased over the course of the interaction, whereas no time effect was found for withdrawing. Higher levels of each partner's demanding were associated with lower levels of their own withdrawing and higher levels of their partner's withdrawing. Finally, higher levels of total demand-withdraw behaviors were associated with lower levels of relationship satisfaction for all couple types. Implications of results for refinement of models of demand-withdraw behavior are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 South McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. baucom@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20545396

Citation

Baucom, Brian R., et al. "Gender, Topic, and Time in Observed Demand-withdraw Interaction in Cross- and Same-sex Couples." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 24, no. 3, 2010, pp. 233-42.
Baucom BR, McFarland PT, Christensen A. Gender, topic, and time in observed demand-withdraw interaction in cross- and same-sex couples. J Fam Psychol. 2010;24(3):233-42.
Baucom, B. R., McFarland, P. T., & Christensen, A. (2010). Gender, topic, and time in observed demand-withdraw interaction in cross- and same-sex couples. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 24(3), 233-42. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0019717
Baucom BR, McFarland PT, Christensen A. Gender, Topic, and Time in Observed Demand-withdraw Interaction in Cross- and Same-sex Couples. J Fam Psychol. 2010;24(3):233-42. PubMed PMID: 20545396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender, topic, and time in observed demand-withdraw interaction in cross- and same-sex couples. AU - Baucom,Brian R, AU - McFarland,Pamela T, AU - Christensen,Andrew, PY - 2010/6/16/entrez PY - 2010/6/16/pubmed PY - 2010/9/29/medline SP - 233 EP - 42 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - The demand-withdraw interaction pattern has been extensively studied and consistently linked to relationship quality in cross-sex relationships, but it has received little study using observational data in same-sex relationships. Demand-withdraw behavior, which occurs when 1 partner makes a complaint or request for a change and the other partner avoids the request or withdraws from the discussion (Christensen, 1988), was observationally coded in the problem-solving interactions of 75 (20 unmarried lesbian, 15 unmarried gay male, 20 unmarried straight cohabiting, and 20 married straight) couples. Results revealed that same- and cross-sex couples engage in demanding and withdrawing behaviors in highly similar ways. For all couples, partners demanded at a higher level during their own issue than during their partner's issue, and withdrew at a higher level during their partner's issue than during their own issue. Women demanded at higher levels than men, and men withdrew at higher levels than women. All partners were more likely to be in a demanding role during their own topic than during their partner's topic. Polarization was greater in woman-selected than in man-selected topics. Demanding increased over the course of the interaction, whereas no time effect was found for withdrawing. Higher levels of each partner's demanding were associated with lower levels of their own withdrawing and higher levels of their partner's withdrawing. Finally, higher levels of total demand-withdraw behaviors were associated with lower levels of relationship satisfaction for all couple types. Implications of results for refinement of models of demand-withdraw behavior are discussed. SN - 1939-1293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20545396/Gender_topic_and_time_in_observed_demand_withdraw_interaction_in_cross__and_same_sex_couples_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -