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Human papillomavirus vaccination of males: attitudes and perceptions of physicians who vaccinate females.
J Adolesc Health. 2010 Jul; 47(1):3-11.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

We assessed U.S. physicians' attitudes and perceptions regarding potential human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of males.

METHODS

We surveyed a random sample of 2,714 pediatricians and family practitioners identified in administrative claims of a U.S. health plan as HPV vaccinators of females; 595 pediatricians and 499 family practitioners participated.

RESULTS

Most physicians would recommend HPV vaccination to males aged 11-12 (63.9%), 13-18 (93.4%), and 19-26 (92.7%) years. Physicians agreed that males should be vaccinated to prevent them from getting genital and anal warts (52.9% strongly and 36.0% somewhat) and to protect females from cervical cancer (75.3% strongly and 20.8% somewhat). Physicians agreed that an HPV vaccine recommendation for males would increase opportunities to discuss sexual health with adolescent male patients (58.7% strongly, 35.3% somewhat). Most did not strongly agree (15.4% strongly, 45.4% somewhat) that parents of adolescent male patients would be interested in HPV vaccination for males, that a gender-neutral HPV vaccine recommendation would increase acceptance by adolescent females and their parents (19.6% strongly, 42.0% somewhat), or that a gender-neutral recommendation would improve current female vaccination rates (10.4% strongly, 26.0% somewhat).

CONCLUSIONS

Physicians who currently vaccinate females against HPV supported the concept of vaccinating males for its benefits for both sexes. They agreed that a gender-neutral HPV vaccination recommendation would be appropriate with regard to public health and believed that it would increase opportunities for sexual health discussions, but were less sure that such a recommendation would change patient or parental attitudes toward HPV vaccination or improve current HPV vaccination efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Global Health Outcomes, Merck & Co., Inc., 770 Sumneytown Pike, West Point, PA 19486-0004, USA. thomas_weiss@merck.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20547286

Citation

Weiss, Thomas W., et al. "Human Papillomavirus Vaccination of Males: Attitudes and Perceptions of Physicians Who Vaccinate Females." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 47, no. 1, 2010, pp. 3-11.
Weiss TW, Zimet GD, Rosenthal SL, et al. Human papillomavirus vaccination of males: attitudes and perceptions of physicians who vaccinate females. J Adolesc Health. 2010;47(1):3-11.
Weiss, T. W., Zimet, G. D., Rosenthal, S. L., Brenneman, S. K., & Klein, J. D. (2010). Human papillomavirus vaccination of males: attitudes and perceptions of physicians who vaccinate females. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 47(1), 3-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.03.003
Weiss TW, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination of Males: Attitudes and Perceptions of Physicians Who Vaccinate Females. J Adolesc Health. 2010;47(1):3-11. PubMed PMID: 20547286.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human papillomavirus vaccination of males: attitudes and perceptions of physicians who vaccinate females. AU - Weiss,Thomas W, AU - Zimet,Gregory D, AU - Rosenthal,Susan L, AU - Brenneman,Susan K, AU - Klein,Jonathan D, Y1 - 2010/04/21/ PY - 2010/02/02/received PY - 2010/03/01/revised PY - 2010/03/02/accepted PY - 2010/6/16/entrez PY - 2010/6/16/pubmed PY - 2010/10/1/medline SP - 3 EP - 11 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 47 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: We assessed U.S. physicians' attitudes and perceptions regarding potential human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of males. METHODS: We surveyed a random sample of 2,714 pediatricians and family practitioners identified in administrative claims of a U.S. health plan as HPV vaccinators of females; 595 pediatricians and 499 family practitioners participated. RESULTS: Most physicians would recommend HPV vaccination to males aged 11-12 (63.9%), 13-18 (93.4%), and 19-26 (92.7%) years. Physicians agreed that males should be vaccinated to prevent them from getting genital and anal warts (52.9% strongly and 36.0% somewhat) and to protect females from cervical cancer (75.3% strongly and 20.8% somewhat). Physicians agreed that an HPV vaccine recommendation for males would increase opportunities to discuss sexual health with adolescent male patients (58.7% strongly, 35.3% somewhat). Most did not strongly agree (15.4% strongly, 45.4% somewhat) that parents of adolescent male patients would be interested in HPV vaccination for males, that a gender-neutral HPV vaccine recommendation would increase acceptance by adolescent females and their parents (19.6% strongly, 42.0% somewhat), or that a gender-neutral recommendation would improve current female vaccination rates (10.4% strongly, 26.0% somewhat). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians who currently vaccinate females against HPV supported the concept of vaccinating males for its benefits for both sexes. They agreed that a gender-neutral HPV vaccination recommendation would be appropriate with regard to public health and believed that it would increase opportunities for sexual health discussions, but were less sure that such a recommendation would change patient or parental attitudes toward HPV vaccination or improve current HPV vaccination efforts. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20547286/Human_papillomavirus_vaccination_of_males:_attitudes_and_perceptions_of_physicians_who_vaccinate_females_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(10)00142-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -