Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Proteome analysis of the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease patients.
Neurosci Lett. 2010 Jul 26; 479(2):175-9.NL

Abstract

Clinical proteomics is a powerful tool that can be used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in disease states, leading to greater understanding of the molecular and cellular events that contribute to disease. The aim of this study was to identify protein changes in the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, with the goal of finding biomarkers for PD diagnosis, and to elucidate the events occurring at the onset of PD. Using differential display to identify proteins with altered expression in PD patients, we obtained 15 protein spots corresponding to 13 different gene products that were likely to be involved in PD. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify differentially expressed proteins, 7 of which have never previously been associated with PD patients. They are likely to be involved in antioxidation, lipid metabolism, intracellular transport, cell proliferation and immunoregulation. The altered levels of these proteins may be related to the pathophysiological mechanisms of PD. As a result, some of these proteins could be considered as candidate biomarkers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Peking University, Beijing 100191, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20553805

Citation

Zhao, Xin, et al. "Proteome Analysis of the Sera From Chinese Parkinson's Disease Patients." Neuroscience Letters, vol. 479, no. 2, 2010, pp. 175-9.
Zhao X, Xiao WZ, Pu XP, et al. Proteome analysis of the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease patients. Neurosci Lett. 2010;479(2):175-9.
Zhao, X., Xiao, W. Z., Pu, X. P., & Zhong, L. J. (2010). Proteome analysis of the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease patients. Neuroscience Letters, 479(2), 175-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2010.05.063
Zhao X, et al. Proteome Analysis of the Sera From Chinese Parkinson's Disease Patients. Neurosci Lett. 2010 Jul 26;479(2):175-9. PubMed PMID: 20553805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Proteome analysis of the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease patients. AU - Zhao,Xin, AU - Xiao,Wei-Zhong, AU - Pu,Xiao-Ping, AU - Zhong,Li-Jun, Y1 - 2010/05/27/ PY - 2010/03/19/received PY - 2010/05/19/revised PY - 2010/05/21/accepted PY - 2010/6/18/entrez PY - 2010/6/18/pubmed PY - 2010/9/29/medline SP - 175 EP - 9 JF - Neuroscience letters JO - Neurosci Lett VL - 479 IS - 2 N2 - Clinical proteomics is a powerful tool that can be used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in disease states, leading to greater understanding of the molecular and cellular events that contribute to disease. The aim of this study was to identify protein changes in the sera from Chinese Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, with the goal of finding biomarkers for PD diagnosis, and to elucidate the events occurring at the onset of PD. Using differential display to identify proteins with altered expression in PD patients, we obtained 15 protein spots corresponding to 13 different gene products that were likely to be involved in PD. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify differentially expressed proteins, 7 of which have never previously been associated with PD patients. They are likely to be involved in antioxidation, lipid metabolism, intracellular transport, cell proliferation and immunoregulation. The altered levels of these proteins may be related to the pathophysiological mechanisms of PD. As a result, some of these proteins could be considered as candidate biomarkers. SN - 1872-7972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20553805/Proteome_analysis_of_the_sera_from_Chinese_Parkinson's_disease_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3940(10)00668-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -