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The relationship between urinary melatonin metabolite excretion and posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic injury.
J Affect Disord. 2010 Dec; 127(1-3):365-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Associations between 24-hour urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder were assessed 2 days, 1 month and 6 months after traumatic injury requiring hospitalisation.

METHODS

Forty-eight participants were recruited following an admission to hospital for an acute traumatic injury. They completed assessments 48h after the accident, 1 month and 6 months later. A 24-hour urine collection was initiated the morning before questionnaires were administered. PTSD symptoms and caseness was determined using the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R) and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale respectively. Urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

RESULTS

Mean age of participants was 34 years (SD=12.72) and 75% were males. Ten (27%) participants met the criteria for PTSD 1 month post trauma and 6 (21%) met the criteria for PTSD at 6 months. Four of the six (67%) participants with PTSD at 6 months were also positive for major depression. Significant negative correlations were found between 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion at day 2 and all subscales and total score of the IES-R at the six month assessment. Controlling for depression, every one unit decrease in 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion was associated with a 13% increase in PTSD risk at six months (OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27). However, this association was lost when self-reported pain, gender and employment was added to the model (OR=1.11, 0.93-1.32).

CONCLUSION

This study provides preliminary data suggesting disrupted melatonin levels in the first 48h following trauma may place individuals at increased risk of PTSD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Military and Veterans Health, School of Population Health and Clinical Practice, The University of Adelaide, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20554012

Citation

McFarlane, Alexander C., et al. "The Relationship Between Urinary Melatonin Metabolite Excretion and Posttraumatic Symptoms Following Traumatic Injury." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 127, no. 1-3, 2010, pp. 365-9.
McFarlane AC, Barton CA, Briggs N, et al. The relationship between urinary melatonin metabolite excretion and posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic injury. J Affect Disord. 2010;127(1-3):365-9.
McFarlane, A. C., Barton, C. A., Briggs, N., & Kennaway, D. J. (2010). The relationship between urinary melatonin metabolite excretion and posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic injury. Journal of Affective Disorders, 127(1-3), 365-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2010.05.002
McFarlane AC, et al. The Relationship Between Urinary Melatonin Metabolite Excretion and Posttraumatic Symptoms Following Traumatic Injury. J Affect Disord. 2010;127(1-3):365-9. PubMed PMID: 20554012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between urinary melatonin metabolite excretion and posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic injury. AU - McFarlane,Alexander C, AU - Barton,Christopher A, AU - Briggs,Nancy, AU - Kennaway,David J, PY - 2009/08/07/received PY - 2010/05/02/revised PY - 2010/05/04/accepted PY - 2010/6/18/entrez PY - 2010/6/18/pubmed PY - 2011/3/2/medline SP - 365 EP - 9 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 127 IS - 1-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Associations between 24-hour urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder were assessed 2 days, 1 month and 6 months after traumatic injury requiring hospitalisation. METHODS: Forty-eight participants were recruited following an admission to hospital for an acute traumatic injury. They completed assessments 48h after the accident, 1 month and 6 months later. A 24-hour urine collection was initiated the morning before questionnaires were administered. PTSD symptoms and caseness was determined using the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R) and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale respectively. Urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin was assayed by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Mean age of participants was 34 years (SD=12.72) and 75% were males. Ten (27%) participants met the criteria for PTSD 1 month post trauma and 6 (21%) met the criteria for PTSD at 6 months. Four of the six (67%) participants with PTSD at 6 months were also positive for major depression. Significant negative correlations were found between 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion at day 2 and all subscales and total score of the IES-R at the six month assessment. Controlling for depression, every one unit decrease in 6-sulphatoxy melatonin excretion was associated with a 13% increase in PTSD risk at six months (OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27). However, this association was lost when self-reported pain, gender and employment was added to the model (OR=1.11, 0.93-1.32). CONCLUSION: This study provides preliminary data suggesting disrupted melatonin levels in the first 48h following trauma may place individuals at increased risk of PTSD. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20554012/The_relationship_between_urinary_melatonin_metabolite_excretion_and_posttraumatic_symptoms_following_traumatic_injury_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(10)00385-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -