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Bioaccessible mineral content of malted finger millet (Eleusine coracana), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and barley (Hordeum vulgare).
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Jul 14; 58(13):8100-3.JA

Abstract

Malted grains are extensively used in weaning and geriatric foods. Malting generally improves the nutrient content and digestibility of foods. The present investigation examined the influence of malting of finger millet, wheat, and barley on the bioaccessibility of iron, zinc, calcium, copper, and manganese. Malting increased the bioaccessibility of iron by >3-fold from the two varieties of finger millet and by >2-fold from wheat, whereas such a beneficial influence was not seen in barley. The bioaccessibility of zinc from wheat and barley increased to an extent of 234 and 100%, respectively, as a result of malting. However, malting reduced the bioaccessibility of zinc from finger millet. Malting marginally increased the bioaccessibility of calcium from white finger millet and wheat. Whereas malting did not exert any influence on bioaccessibility of copper from finger millet and wheat, it significantly decreased (75%) the same from barley. Malting did increase the bioaccessibility of manganese from brown finger millet (17%) and wheat (42%). Thus, malting could be an appropriate food-based strategy to derive iron and other minerals maximally from food grains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Central Food Technological Research Institute, CSIR, Mysore 570 020, India. kalpanaplatel@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20560601

Citation

Platel, Kalpana, et al. "Bioaccessible Mineral Content of Malted Finger Millet (Eleusine Coracana), Wheat (Triticum Aestivum), and Barley (Hordeum Vulgare)." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 58, no. 13, 2010, pp. 8100-3.
Platel K, Eipeson SW, Srinivasan K. Bioaccessible mineral content of malted finger millet (Eleusine coracana), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58(13):8100-3.
Platel, K., Eipeson, S. W., & Srinivasan, K. (2010). Bioaccessible mineral content of malted finger millet (Eleusine coracana), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58(13), 8100-3. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf100846e
Platel K, Eipeson SW, Srinivasan K. Bioaccessible Mineral Content of Malted Finger Millet (Eleusine Coracana), Wheat (Triticum Aestivum), and Barley (Hordeum Vulgare). J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Jul 14;58(13):8100-3. PubMed PMID: 20560601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioaccessible mineral content of malted finger millet (Eleusine coracana), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). AU - Platel,Kalpana, AU - Eipeson,Sushma W, AU - Srinivasan,Krishnapura, PY - 2010/6/22/entrez PY - 2010/6/22/pubmed PY - 2010/10/22/medline SP - 8100 EP - 3 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 58 IS - 13 N2 - Malted grains are extensively used in weaning and geriatric foods. Malting generally improves the nutrient content and digestibility of foods. The present investigation examined the influence of malting of finger millet, wheat, and barley on the bioaccessibility of iron, zinc, calcium, copper, and manganese. Malting increased the bioaccessibility of iron by >3-fold from the two varieties of finger millet and by >2-fold from wheat, whereas such a beneficial influence was not seen in barley. The bioaccessibility of zinc from wheat and barley increased to an extent of 234 and 100%, respectively, as a result of malting. However, malting reduced the bioaccessibility of zinc from finger millet. Malting marginally increased the bioaccessibility of calcium from white finger millet and wheat. Whereas malting did not exert any influence on bioaccessibility of copper from finger millet and wheat, it significantly decreased (75%) the same from barley. Malting did increase the bioaccessibility of manganese from brown finger millet (17%) and wheat (42%). Thus, malting could be an appropriate food-based strategy to derive iron and other minerals maximally from food grains. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20560601/Bioaccessible_mineral_content_of_malted_finger_millet__Eleusine_coracana__wheat__Triticum_aestivum__and_barley__Hordeum_vulgare__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf100846e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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