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Home air-conditioning, traffic exposure, and asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Feb; 22(1 Pt 2):e112-8.PA

Abstract

Epidemiological data suggest that traffic exposures can influence asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children; however, there is no information on risk reduction via home air-conditioning (AC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations of self-reported traffic densities with asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children and determine whether AC is an effect modifier. A cross-sectional study adopting an expanded and modified ISAAC--International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood conducted on randomly selected 2994 children living in homes without any indoor risk factors. Specific information on demographics, indoor home risk factors, and traffic variables were obtained. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were determined by Cox proportional hazard regression model with assumption of a constant risk period controlled for covariates. We found dose-response significant relationships between validated self-reported traffic densities and asthma and rhinitis symptoms. Among children sleeping in non-air-conditioned homes, there were stronger associations between asthma and rhinitis symptoms studied. PRs for heavy traffic density were 2.06 for wheeze (95% CI 0.97-4.38), 2.89 for asthma (1.14-7.32), 1.73 for rhinitis (1.00-2.99), and 3.39 for rhinoconjunctivitis (1.24-9.27). There were no associations found for children sleeping in air-conditioned homes. Our results suggest that AC in the bedroom modifies the health effects of traffic among preschool children. This finding suggests that attention should also be paid to ventilation characteristics of the homes to remediate health-related traffic pollution problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, Singapore. zuraimi.sultan@nrc-cnrc.gc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20561230

Citation

Zuraimi, Mohamed Sultan, et al. "Home Air-conditioning, Traffic Exposure, and Asthma and Allergic Symptoms Among Preschool Children." Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, vol. 22, no. 1 Pt 2, 2011, pp. e112-8.
Zuraimi MS, Tham KW, Chew FT, et al. Home air-conditioning, traffic exposure, and asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011;22(1 Pt 2):e112-8.
Zuraimi, M. S., Tham, K. W., Chew, F. T., Ooi, P. L., & Koh, D. (2011). Home air-conditioning, traffic exposure, and asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 22(1 Pt 2), e112-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.00992.x
Zuraimi MS, et al. Home Air-conditioning, Traffic Exposure, and Asthma and Allergic Symptoms Among Preschool Children. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011;22(1 Pt 2):e112-8. PubMed PMID: 20561230.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Home air-conditioning, traffic exposure, and asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children. AU - Zuraimi,Mohamed Sultan, AU - Tham,Kwok-Wai, AU - Chew,Fook-Tim, AU - Ooi,Peng-Lim, AU - Koh,David, PY - 2010/6/22/entrez PY - 2010/6/22/pubmed PY - 2011/6/18/medline SP - e112 EP - 8 JF - Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology JO - Pediatr Allergy Immunol VL - 22 IS - 1 Pt 2 N2 - Epidemiological data suggest that traffic exposures can influence asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children; however, there is no information on risk reduction via home air-conditioning (AC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations of self-reported traffic densities with asthma and allergic symptoms among preschool children and determine whether AC is an effect modifier. A cross-sectional study adopting an expanded and modified ISAAC--International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood conducted on randomly selected 2994 children living in homes without any indoor risk factors. Specific information on demographics, indoor home risk factors, and traffic variables were obtained. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were determined by Cox proportional hazard regression model with assumption of a constant risk period controlled for covariates. We found dose-response significant relationships between validated self-reported traffic densities and asthma and rhinitis symptoms. Among children sleeping in non-air-conditioned homes, there were stronger associations between asthma and rhinitis symptoms studied. PRs for heavy traffic density were 2.06 for wheeze (95% CI 0.97-4.38), 2.89 for asthma (1.14-7.32), 1.73 for rhinitis (1.00-2.99), and 3.39 for rhinoconjunctivitis (1.24-9.27). There were no associations found for children sleeping in air-conditioned homes. Our results suggest that AC in the bedroom modifies the health effects of traffic among preschool children. This finding suggests that attention should also be paid to ventilation characteristics of the homes to remediate health-related traffic pollution problems. SN - 1399-3038 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20561230/Home_air_conditioning_traffic_exposure_and_asthma_and_allergic_symptoms_among_preschool_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.00992.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -