Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of montelukast or salmeterol added to inhaled fluticasone on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 Jun; 104(6):511-7.AA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the effect of montelukast, 5 mg, or inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg, added to inhaled fluticasone in reducing the maximum percentage decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after a standardized exercise challenge and response to rescue bronchodilation with albuterol in children aged 6 to 14 years with persistent asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB).

METHODS

Randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, 2-period, 4-week, crossover study conducted between December 22, 2005 and November 14, 2008 at 30 centers in Europe, Asia, Mexico, and South America. Patients with asthma receiving inhaled corticosteroids demonstrated an FEV1 of 70% or higher of the predicted value and EIB (defined as a decrease in FEV1 > or = 15% compared with preexercise baseline FEV1 on 2 occasions before randomization). Standardized exercise challenges were performed at baseline (prerandomization) and at the end of each active treatment period.

RESULTS

Of 154 patients randomized, 145 completed the study. Montelukast, compared with salmeterol, significantly reduced the mean maximum percentage decrease in FEV1 (10.6% vs 13.8%; P = .009), mean area under the curve for the first 20 minutes after exercise (116.0% x min vs 168.8% x min; P = .006), and median time to recovery (6.0 vs 11.1 minutes; P = .04). Response to albuterol rescue after exercise challenge was significantly greater (P < .001) with montelukast. Montelukast and salmeterol were generally well tolerated.

CONCLUSIONS

Attenuation and response of EIB to albuterol rescue after exercise challenge were significantly better with montelukast than with salmeterol after 4 weeks of treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, New Jersey, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20568384

Citation

Fogel, Robert B., et al. "Effect of Montelukast or Salmeterol Added to Inhaled Fluticasone On Exercise-induced Bronchoconstriction in Children." Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, vol. 104, no. 6, 2010, pp. 511-7.
Fogel RB, Rosario N, Aristizabal G, et al. Effect of montelukast or salmeterol added to inhaled fluticasone on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010;104(6):511-7.
Fogel, R. B., Rosario, N., Aristizabal, G., Loeys, T., Noonan, G., Gaile, S., Smugar, S. S., & Polos, P. G. (2010). Effect of montelukast or salmeterol added to inhaled fluticasone on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, 104(6), 511-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2009.12.011
Fogel RB, et al. Effect of Montelukast or Salmeterol Added to Inhaled Fluticasone On Exercise-induced Bronchoconstriction in Children. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010;104(6):511-7. PubMed PMID: 20568384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of montelukast or salmeterol added to inhaled fluticasone on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children. AU - Fogel,Robert B, AU - Rosario,Nelson, AU - Aristizabal,Gustavo, AU - Loeys,Tom, AU - Noonan,Gertrude, AU - Gaile,Sima, AU - Smugar,Steven S, AU - Polos,Peter G, PY - 2010/6/24/entrez PY - 2010/6/24/pubmed PY - 2010/7/9/medline SP - 511 EP - 7 JF - Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology JO - Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol VL - 104 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of montelukast, 5 mg, or inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg, added to inhaled fluticasone in reducing the maximum percentage decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after a standardized exercise challenge and response to rescue bronchodilation with albuterol in children aged 6 to 14 years with persistent asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, 2-period, 4-week, crossover study conducted between December 22, 2005 and November 14, 2008 at 30 centers in Europe, Asia, Mexico, and South America. Patients with asthma receiving inhaled corticosteroids demonstrated an FEV1 of 70% or higher of the predicted value and EIB (defined as a decrease in FEV1 > or = 15% compared with preexercise baseline FEV1 on 2 occasions before randomization). Standardized exercise challenges were performed at baseline (prerandomization) and at the end of each active treatment period. RESULTS: Of 154 patients randomized, 145 completed the study. Montelukast, compared with salmeterol, significantly reduced the mean maximum percentage decrease in FEV1 (10.6% vs 13.8%; P = .009), mean area under the curve for the first 20 minutes after exercise (116.0% x min vs 168.8% x min; P = .006), and median time to recovery (6.0 vs 11.1 minutes; P = .04). Response to albuterol rescue after exercise challenge was significantly greater (P < .001) with montelukast. Montelukast and salmeterol were generally well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Attenuation and response of EIB to albuterol rescue after exercise challenge were significantly better with montelukast than with salmeterol after 4 weeks of treatment. SN - 1081-1206 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20568384/Effect_of_montelukast_or_salmeterol_added_to_inhaled_fluticasone_on_exercise_induced_bronchoconstriction_in_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1081-1206(10)00375-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -