Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Nov 01; 112(1-2):33-8.DA

Abstract

AIMS

To investigate trends in rates of ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008, and to examine the associations between the major sociodemographic factors, especially gender, and ecstasy use, during this period.

METHODS

The adolescent subsamples (age 12-17) from 1999 to 2008 NHSDA/NSDUH surveys were used for the current study. Data from adolescents' self-reports on use of ecstasy and of other drugs, as well as sociodemographic characteristics, were used in the analyses.

RESULTS

There was an increasing trend in adolescent ecstasy use from 1999 to 2002, which was followed by a decreasing trend from 2002 to 2005, and a slight rise from 2005 to 2008. In contrast to some other drugs, ecstasy was more likely to be used by girls than by boys. This gender difference persisted over the 10-year period and could not be explained by other demographic factors.

CONCLUSION

Given the known health consequences of ecstasy use, especially for females, the observed gender difference in adolescent ecstasy use should be taken into account by drug prevention and intervention programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Unit 43, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. wup@childpsych.columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20570447

Citation

Wu, Ping, et al. "Ecstasy Use Among US Adolescents From 1999 to 2008." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 112, no. 1-2, 2010, pp. 33-8.
Wu P, Liu X, Pham TH, et al. Ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010;112(1-2):33-8.
Wu, P., Liu, X., Pham, T. H., Jin, J., Fan, B., & Jin, Z. (2010). Ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 112(1-2), 33-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.05.006
Wu P, et al. Ecstasy Use Among US Adolescents From 1999 to 2008. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Nov 1;112(1-2):33-8. PubMed PMID: 20570447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008. AU - Wu,Ping, AU - Liu,Xinhua, AU - Pham,Trang Hoang, AU - Jin,Jue, AU - Fan,Bin, AU - Jin,Zhezhen, Y1 - 2010/06/08/ PY - 2009/12/08/received PY - 2010/05/04/revised PY - 2010/05/04/accepted PY - 2010/6/24/entrez PY - 2010/6/24/pubmed PY - 2011/5/3/medline SP - 33 EP - 8 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 112 IS - 1-2 N2 - AIMS: To investigate trends in rates of ecstasy use among US adolescents from 1999 to 2008, and to examine the associations between the major sociodemographic factors, especially gender, and ecstasy use, during this period. METHODS: The adolescent subsamples (age 12-17) from 1999 to 2008 NHSDA/NSDUH surveys were used for the current study. Data from adolescents' self-reports on use of ecstasy and of other drugs, as well as sociodemographic characteristics, were used in the analyses. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in adolescent ecstasy use from 1999 to 2002, which was followed by a decreasing trend from 2002 to 2005, and a slight rise from 2005 to 2008. In contrast to some other drugs, ecstasy was more likely to be used by girls than by boys. This gender difference persisted over the 10-year period and could not be explained by other demographic factors. CONCLUSION: Given the known health consequences of ecstasy use, especially for females, the observed gender difference in adolescent ecstasy use should be taken into account by drug prevention and intervention programs. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20570447/Ecstasy_use_among_US_adolescents_from_1999_to_2008_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(10)00179-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -