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The respective relationships between lipoprotein profile, macular pigment optical density, and serum concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Nov; 51(11):5897-905.IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

The dietary carotenoids lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are transported on lipoproteins in the serum. The mechanism of delivery of L and Z to the macula, where they constitute macular pigment (MP), is poorly understood. This study was an investigation of the respective relationships between serum lipoprotein profile, MP optical density (MPOD), and serum L and Z.

METHODS

Three hundred two healthy subjects were recruited; 211 (69.9%) were women. Demographic and health details were recorded. Fasting blood samples were taken for lipoprotein analysis by spectrophotometric assay and L and Z analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. MPOD was measured by heterochromatic flicker photometry.

RESULTS

The mean ± SD (range) age of all subjects was 48 ± 11 (21-66) years. There was a statistically significant and positive association between serum L concentration and both serum cholesterol concentration (r = 0.239, P < 0.001) and serum HDL concentration (r = 0.324, P < 0.001), but not with serum LDL concentration (r = 0.095, P = 0.101). There was a statistically significant but inverse association between serum triglyceride concentration and total MPOD (r = -0.118, P = 0.044). There was no significant association between MPOD and serum cholesterol concentration or serum HDL concentration (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that HDL is important for the transport of L in serum. The mechanism(s) whereby L and Z are captured by the macula and whether the serum (apo)lipoprotein profile is important in the transfer of the carotenoids from serum to retina merit further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Macular Pigment Research Group, Department of Chemical and Life Sciences, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland. edwardloane@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20574027

Citation

Loane, Edward, et al. "The Respective Relationships Between Lipoprotein Profile, Macular Pigment Optical Density, and Serum Concentrations of Lutein and Zeaxanthin." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 51, no. 11, 2010, pp. 5897-905.
Loane E, Nolan JM, Beatty S. The respective relationships between lipoprotein profile, macular pigment optical density, and serum concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010;51(11):5897-905.
Loane, E., Nolan, J. M., & Beatty, S. (2010). The respective relationships between lipoprotein profile, macular pigment optical density, and serum concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 51(11), 5897-905. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.09-4878
Loane E, Nolan JM, Beatty S. The Respective Relationships Between Lipoprotein Profile, Macular Pigment Optical Density, and Serum Concentrations of Lutein and Zeaxanthin. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010;51(11):5897-905. PubMed PMID: 20574027.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The respective relationships between lipoprotein profile, macular pigment optical density, and serum concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin. AU - Loane,Edward, AU - Nolan,John M, AU - Beatty,Stephen, Y1 - 2010/06/23/ PY - 2010/6/25/entrez PY - 2010/6/25/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 5897 EP - 905 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci VL - 51 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: The dietary carotenoids lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are transported on lipoproteins in the serum. The mechanism of delivery of L and Z to the macula, where they constitute macular pigment (MP), is poorly understood. This study was an investigation of the respective relationships between serum lipoprotein profile, MP optical density (MPOD), and serum L and Z. METHODS: Three hundred two healthy subjects were recruited; 211 (69.9%) were women. Demographic and health details were recorded. Fasting blood samples were taken for lipoprotein analysis by spectrophotometric assay and L and Z analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. MPOD was measured by heterochromatic flicker photometry. RESULTS: The mean ± SD (range) age of all subjects was 48 ± 11 (21-66) years. There was a statistically significant and positive association between serum L concentration and both serum cholesterol concentration (r = 0.239, P < 0.001) and serum HDL concentration (r = 0.324, P < 0.001), but not with serum LDL concentration (r = 0.095, P = 0.101). There was a statistically significant but inverse association between serum triglyceride concentration and total MPOD (r = -0.118, P = 0.044). There was no significant association between MPOD and serum cholesterol concentration or serum HDL concentration (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that HDL is important for the transport of L in serum. The mechanism(s) whereby L and Z are captured by the macula and whether the serum (apo)lipoprotein profile is important in the transfer of the carotenoids from serum to retina merit further study. SN - 1552-5783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20574027/The_respective_relationships_between_lipoprotein_profile_macular_pigment_optical_density_and_serum_concentrations_of_lutein_and_zeaxanthin_ L2 - https://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/iovs.09-4878 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -