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Reduction in gastroenteritis with the use of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in a primary practice.
Pediatrics. 2010 Jul; 126(1):e40-5.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Pentavalent rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RV5) was licensed in 2006 and recommended for routine childhood immunization. A significant decrease in the number of RV hospitalizations has been described. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of RV5 on acute gastroenteritis (AGE) seen in a primary practice.

METHODS

In July 2004, surveillance was initiated among children who were younger than 5 years and seen in a large pediatric practice in New Orleans for those who presented AGE, as determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Primary care physician office visits, emergency department visits, and hospital admissions were identified by review of records. RV testing was performed only on those who were seen at the hospital.

RESULTS

Approximately 16,000 children who were younger than 5 years were followed in the practice during each year. For 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009, 11.1%, 40.3%, and 45.6% of age-eligible children, respectively, received > or =1 dose of RV5. As compared with 2004-2005 (before RV5), in 2007-2009, there was a significant decrease in all-cause AGE office visits (23%) and hospitalizations (50%). RV-positive cases (emergency department visits or hospitalizations) decreased by 67%. The decrease in RV-positive cases was more evident among children who were younger than 2 years (81%), with a strong trend among those who were aged 2 to <5 years (41%).

CONCLUSIONS

Increased use of RV5 in a pediatric practice was associated with fewer AGE office visits and hospitalizations. The reduction was specific for RV-positive AGE and seen among children who were targeted for immunization as well as older groups, suggesting a herd-immunity effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. rbegue@lsuhsc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20587671

Citation

Bégué, Rodolfo E., and Keith Perrin. "Reduction in Gastroenteritis With the Use of Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine in a Primary Practice." Pediatrics, vol. 126, no. 1, 2010, pp. e40-5.
Bégué RE, Perrin K. Reduction in gastroenteritis with the use of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in a primary practice. Pediatrics. 2010;126(1):e40-5.
Bégué, R. E., & Perrin, K. (2010). Reduction in gastroenteritis with the use of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in a primary practice. Pediatrics, 126(1), e40-5. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-2069
Bégué RE, Perrin K. Reduction in Gastroenteritis With the Use of Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine in a Primary Practice. Pediatrics. 2010;126(1):e40-5. PubMed PMID: 20587671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduction in gastroenteritis with the use of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in a primary practice. AU - Bégué,Rodolfo E, AU - Perrin,Keith, Y1 - 2010/06/29/ PY - 2010/7/1/entrez PY - 2010/7/1/pubmed PY - 2010/7/29/medline SP - e40 EP - 5 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 126 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Pentavalent rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RV5) was licensed in 2006 and recommended for routine childhood immunization. A significant decrease in the number of RV hospitalizations has been described. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of RV5 on acute gastroenteritis (AGE) seen in a primary practice. METHODS: In July 2004, surveillance was initiated among children who were younger than 5 years and seen in a large pediatric practice in New Orleans for those who presented AGE, as determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Primary care physician office visits, emergency department visits, and hospital admissions were identified by review of records. RV testing was performed only on those who were seen at the hospital. RESULTS: Approximately 16,000 children who were younger than 5 years were followed in the practice during each year. For 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009, 11.1%, 40.3%, and 45.6% of age-eligible children, respectively, received > or =1 dose of RV5. As compared with 2004-2005 (before RV5), in 2007-2009, there was a significant decrease in all-cause AGE office visits (23%) and hospitalizations (50%). RV-positive cases (emergency department visits or hospitalizations) decreased by 67%. The decrease in RV-positive cases was more evident among children who were younger than 2 years (81%), with a strong trend among those who were aged 2 to <5 years (41%). CONCLUSIONS: Increased use of RV5 in a pediatric practice was associated with fewer AGE office visits and hospitalizations. The reduction was specific for RV-positive AGE and seen among children who were targeted for immunization as well as older groups, suggesting a herd-immunity effect. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20587671/Reduction_in_gastroenteritis_with_the_use_of_pentavalent_rotavirus_vaccine_in_a_primary_practice_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=20587671 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -