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High prevalence of late relapse and reinfection in prisoners treated for chronic hepatitis C.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Jul; 25(7):1276-80.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Prisoners have a high prevalence of injection drug use (IDU) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. Treatment of CHC in these patients is effective; however, their long-term outcomes following treatment are unknown. We determined the durability of a sustained virological response (SVR) in prisoners treated for CHC.

METHODS

Patients were treated as part of routine clinical practice with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. A retrospective review of medical records and a computerized pathology system was performed for clinical and laboratory information.

RESULTS

Seventy-four prisoners (70 males, mean age 34 years, IDU in 55%) were evaluable for a SVR over a 12-year period to December 2008; the mean follow-up period was 1243 days. Genotype 1, 2, 3, and 6 infection was present in 18, three, 38 and three patients, respectively; the genotype was unknown in 12. Three out of 52 biopsied had cirrhosis. Standard IFN was administered to 25 (34%; 11 with ribavirin), and 49 received pegylated IFN and ribavirin; one did not complete treatment, and two had breakthrough relapses. The end-of-treatment response was achieved in 57 and SVR in 53; 14 were non-responders. Five male patients, four with unknown genotypes and treated with standard IFN alone, relapsed late (following SVR, 9%). Five patients, all treated with pegylated IFN and ribavirin, were reinfected (one prior to and four following SVR).

CONCLUSIONS

Prisoners are often successfully treated for CHC. However, this retrospective study indicates that there is a high (17%) prevalence of late recurrence of viremia that is likely a reflection of reinfection due to ongoing risk-taking behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20594255

Citation

Bate, John P., et al. "High Prevalence of Late Relapse and Reinfection in Prisoners Treated for Chronic Hepatitis C." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 25, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1276-80.
Bate JP, Colman AJ, Frost PJ, et al. High prevalence of late relapse and reinfection in prisoners treated for chronic hepatitis C. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010;25(7):1276-80.
Bate, J. P., Colman, A. J., Frost, P. J., Shaw, D. R., & Harley, H. A. (2010). High prevalence of late relapse and reinfection in prisoners treated for chronic hepatitis C. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 25(7), 1276-80. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2010.06295.x
Bate JP, et al. High Prevalence of Late Relapse and Reinfection in Prisoners Treated for Chronic Hepatitis C. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010;25(7):1276-80. PubMed PMID: 20594255.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High prevalence of late relapse and reinfection in prisoners treated for chronic hepatitis C. AU - Bate,John P, AU - Colman,Anton J, AU - Frost,Peter J, AU - Shaw,David R, AU - Harley,Hugh A J, PY - 2010/7/3/entrez PY - 2010/7/3/pubmed PY - 2010/10/19/medline SP - 1276 EP - 80 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 25 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Prisoners have a high prevalence of injection drug use (IDU) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. Treatment of CHC in these patients is effective; however, their long-term outcomes following treatment are unknown. We determined the durability of a sustained virological response (SVR) in prisoners treated for CHC. METHODS: Patients were treated as part of routine clinical practice with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. A retrospective review of medical records and a computerized pathology system was performed for clinical and laboratory information. RESULTS: Seventy-four prisoners (70 males, mean age 34 years, IDU in 55%) were evaluable for a SVR over a 12-year period to December 2008; the mean follow-up period was 1243 days. Genotype 1, 2, 3, and 6 infection was present in 18, three, 38 and three patients, respectively; the genotype was unknown in 12. Three out of 52 biopsied had cirrhosis. Standard IFN was administered to 25 (34%; 11 with ribavirin), and 49 received pegylated IFN and ribavirin; one did not complete treatment, and two had breakthrough relapses. The end-of-treatment response was achieved in 57 and SVR in 53; 14 were non-responders. Five male patients, four with unknown genotypes and treated with standard IFN alone, relapsed late (following SVR, 9%). Five patients, all treated with pegylated IFN and ribavirin, were reinfected (one prior to and four following SVR). CONCLUSIONS: Prisoners are often successfully treated for CHC. However, this retrospective study indicates that there is a high (17%) prevalence of late recurrence of viremia that is likely a reflection of reinfection due to ongoing risk-taking behavior. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20594255/High_prevalence_of_late_relapse_and_reinfection_in_prisoners_treated_for_chronic_hepatitis_C_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2010.06295.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -