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Vitamin B-12 status is not associated with plasma homocysteine in parents and their preschool children: lacto-ovo, lacto, and ovo vegetarians and omnivores.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Feb; 29(1):7-13.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Vegetarians may be at risk of certain nutrient deficiencies, particularly vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may increase plasma homocysteine concentration and thus may potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in vegetarians. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare plasma homocysteine and vitamin B-12 status in vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents. In addition, the association between parents' and children's homocysteine and vitamin B-12 concentration was also examined.

METHODS

Fifty-six omnivores (28 preschool children and one of their parents), 34 lacto-ovo vegetarians (16 parents and 18 children), 5 ovo vegetarians (2 parents and 3 children), 1 lacto vegetarian parent, and 2 vegan parents were enrolled in this study. The mean age of preschool children was 5.1 +/- 1.3 years and that of their parent was 35.4 +/- 4.2 years. Nutrient intakes were recorded using 3-day dietary records. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained to measure serum creatinine, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hematological parameters, plasma homocysteine, serum folate, and vitamin B-12 concentrations.

RESULTS

There was no significant difference in dietary folate intake between vegetarian and omnivores within parent and child groups. The mean plasma homocysteine level of vegetarian parents and their children was in the physiological range, and they had slightly but not significantly higher plasma homocysteine levels than omnivores. Omnivorous parents and their children had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intake than vegetarian participants but similar serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Plasma homocysteine concentration was significantly and negatively associated with only serum folate levels (beta = -0.15) and dietary vitamin B-12 intake (beta = -0.05) in the omnivorous parents after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and serum creatinine.

CONCLUSION

Vegetarian parents and their preschool children had a lower vitamin B-12 intake than omnivorous parents and their preschool children but similar plasma vitamin B-12 and homocysteine concentrations. Plasma homocysteine was not associated with serum vitamin B-12 levels in the parent, child, or pooled group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Early Childhood Development and Education, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20595640

Citation

Yen, Chin-En, et al. "Vitamin B-12 Status Is Not Associated With Plasma Homocysteine in Parents and Their Preschool Children: Lacto-ovo, Lacto, and Ovo Vegetarians and Omnivores." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 29, no. 1, 2010, pp. 7-13.
Yen CE, Yen CH, Cheng CH, et al. Vitamin B-12 status is not associated with plasma homocysteine in parents and their preschool children: lacto-ovo, lacto, and ovo vegetarians and omnivores. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(1):7-13.
Yen, C. E., Yen, C. H., Cheng, C. H., & Huang, Y. C. (2010). Vitamin B-12 status is not associated with plasma homocysteine in parents and their preschool children: lacto-ovo, lacto, and ovo vegetarians and omnivores. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(1), 7-13.
Yen CE, et al. Vitamin B-12 Status Is Not Associated With Plasma Homocysteine in Parents and Their Preschool Children: Lacto-ovo, Lacto, and Ovo Vegetarians and Omnivores. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(1):7-13. PubMed PMID: 20595640.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin B-12 status is not associated with plasma homocysteine in parents and their preschool children: lacto-ovo, lacto, and ovo vegetarians and omnivores. AU - Yen,Chin-En, AU - Yen,Chi-Hua, AU - Cheng,Chien-Hsiang, AU - Huang,Yi-Chia, PY - 2010/7/3/entrez PY - 2010/7/3/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 7 EP - 13 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Vegetarians may be at risk of certain nutrient deficiencies, particularly vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may increase plasma homocysteine concentration and thus may potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in vegetarians. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare plasma homocysteine and vitamin B-12 status in vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents. In addition, the association between parents' and children's homocysteine and vitamin B-12 concentration was also examined. METHODS: Fifty-six omnivores (28 preschool children and one of their parents), 34 lacto-ovo vegetarians (16 parents and 18 children), 5 ovo vegetarians (2 parents and 3 children), 1 lacto vegetarian parent, and 2 vegan parents were enrolled in this study. The mean age of preschool children was 5.1 +/- 1.3 years and that of their parent was 35.4 +/- 4.2 years. Nutrient intakes were recorded using 3-day dietary records. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained to measure serum creatinine, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hematological parameters, plasma homocysteine, serum folate, and vitamin B-12 concentrations. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in dietary folate intake between vegetarian and omnivores within parent and child groups. The mean plasma homocysteine level of vegetarian parents and their children was in the physiological range, and they had slightly but not significantly higher plasma homocysteine levels than omnivores. Omnivorous parents and their children had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intake than vegetarian participants but similar serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Plasma homocysteine concentration was significantly and negatively associated with only serum folate levels (beta = -0.15) and dietary vitamin B-12 intake (beta = -0.05) in the omnivorous parents after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and serum creatinine. CONCLUSION: Vegetarian parents and their preschool children had a lower vitamin B-12 intake than omnivorous parents and their preschool children but similar plasma vitamin B-12 and homocysteine concentrations. Plasma homocysteine was not associated with serum vitamin B-12 levels in the parent, child, or pooled group. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20595640/Vitamin_B_12_status_is_not_associated_with_plasma_homocysteine_in_parents_and_their_preschool_children:_lacto_ovo_lacto_and_ovo_vegetarians_and_omnivores_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719811 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -