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Body height and sex-related differences in incidence of venous thromboembolism: a Danish follow-up study.
Eur J Intern Med 2010; 21(4):268-72EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sex-related differences in incidence rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been reported. It is unclear whether these differences reflect sex-related differences in the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or both and to which extent the differences are mediated by known risk factors for VTE.

OBJECTIVE

To compare the incidence of DVT and PE between middle-aged men and women.

METHODS

We computed sex-specific incidences of VTE, DVT and PE and estimated the crude and adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of VTE, DVT and PE using Cox regression for men versus women participating in the prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. We controlled for body mass index, body height, leisure-time physical activity and smoking dose.

RESULTS

We verified 641 VTE events during a median follow-up time of 10 years. The overall incidence of VTE was 1.15 [95%CI: 1.07-1.25] per thousand person years; it was higher for men than women (crude IRR: 1.55 [95%CI: 1.32-1.82]). The adjusted IRR for DVT was 1.06 [95%CI: 0.75-1.50] and for PE 0.60 [95%CI: 0.41-1.18] for men versus women. The higher rate among men appeared to be mediated mainly by body height.

CONCLUSIONS

In this middle-aged population, men experienced a higher incidence of VTE due to a higher incidence of DVT. The higher incidence among men appeared to be mediated by body height. Adjusted for body height, male sex was not associated with an excess risk of either VTE or DVT but the risk of PE was notably lower compared with women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg and Aarhus, Denmark. m.severinsen@rn.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20603033

Citation

Severinsen, Marianne Tang, et al. "Body Height and Sex-related Differences in Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism: a Danish Follow-up Study." European Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 21, no. 4, 2010, pp. 268-72.
Severinsen MT, Johnsen SP, Tjønneland A, et al. Body height and sex-related differences in incidence of venous thromboembolism: a Danish follow-up study. Eur J Intern Med. 2010;21(4):268-72.
Severinsen, M. T., Johnsen, S. P., Tjønneland, A., Overvad, K., Dethlefsen, C., & Kristensen, S. R. (2010). Body height and sex-related differences in incidence of venous thromboembolism: a Danish follow-up study. European Journal of Internal Medicine, 21(4), pp. 268-72. doi:10.1016/j.ejim.2010.03.013.
Severinsen MT, et al. Body Height and Sex-related Differences in Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism: a Danish Follow-up Study. Eur J Intern Med. 2010;21(4):268-72. PubMed PMID: 20603033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body height and sex-related differences in incidence of venous thromboembolism: a Danish follow-up study. AU - Severinsen,Marianne Tang, AU - Johnsen,Søren Paaske, AU - Tjønneland,Anne, AU - Overvad,Kim, AU - Dethlefsen,Claus, AU - Kristensen,Søren Risom, Y1 - 2010/04/28/ PY - 2009/11/19/received PY - 2010/01/04/revised PY - 2010/03/25/accepted PY - 2010/7/7/entrez PY - 2010/7/7/pubmed PY - 2010/11/10/medline SP - 268 EP - 72 JF - European journal of internal medicine JO - Eur. J. Intern. Med. VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sex-related differences in incidence rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been reported. It is unclear whether these differences reflect sex-related differences in the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or both and to which extent the differences are mediated by known risk factors for VTE. OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of DVT and PE between middle-aged men and women. METHODS: We computed sex-specific incidences of VTE, DVT and PE and estimated the crude and adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of VTE, DVT and PE using Cox regression for men versus women participating in the prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. We controlled for body mass index, body height, leisure-time physical activity and smoking dose. RESULTS: We verified 641 VTE events during a median follow-up time of 10 years. The overall incidence of VTE was 1.15 [95%CI: 1.07-1.25] per thousand person years; it was higher for men than women (crude IRR: 1.55 [95%CI: 1.32-1.82]). The adjusted IRR for DVT was 1.06 [95%CI: 0.75-1.50] and for PE 0.60 [95%CI: 0.41-1.18] for men versus women. The higher rate among men appeared to be mediated mainly by body height. CONCLUSIONS: In this middle-aged population, men experienced a higher incidence of VTE due to a higher incidence of DVT. The higher incidence among men appeared to be mediated by body height. Adjusted for body height, male sex was not associated with an excess risk of either VTE or DVT but the risk of PE was notably lower compared with women. SN - 1879-0828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20603033/Body_height_and_sex_related_differences_in_incidence_of_venous_thromboembolism:_a_Danish_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0953-6205(10)00056-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -