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Emotional competence and behavior problems: Differences across Preschool Assessment of Attachment classifications.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 Jul; 15(3):391-406.CC

Abstract

This study examined attachment in association with preschoolers' emotional functioning among 54 predominantly low-income families living in Appalachia. Attachment was assessed at age 4 years using the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978) and classified with the PAA (Crittenden, 2004). Emotional competence was measured via an interview about children's memories for six emotions, rated in terms of both emotion understanding and regulation. Parent-, teacher-, and self-reports of children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms were also completed. Questionnaires and interviews assessed socioeconomic risk and parental symptoms and negative childhood experiences. Children's PAA strategies were significantly associated with risks, emotion regulation and understanding, and symptoms. Children using highly coercive strategies showed the greatest difficulties. Emotion regulation and understanding also were associated with parent- and teacher-report of symptoms. These findings suggest that intervention efforts with at-risk youngsters should target not only attachment security, but also emotional competence skills.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Morehead State University, Morehead, KY 40351, USA. s.kidwell@morehead-st.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20603426

Citation

Kidwell, Shari L., et al. "Emotional Competence and Behavior Problems: Differences Across Preschool Assessment of Attachment Classifications." Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol. 15, no. 3, 2010, pp. 391-406.
Kidwell SL, Young ME, Hinkle LD, et al. Emotional competence and behavior problems: Differences across Preschool Assessment of Attachment classifications. Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010;15(3):391-406.
Kidwell, S. L., Young, M. E., Hinkle, L. D., Ratliff, A. D., Marcum, M. E., & Martin, C. N. (2010). Emotional competence and behavior problems: Differences across Preschool Assessment of Attachment classifications. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 15(3), 391-406. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359104510367589
Kidwell SL, et al. Emotional Competence and Behavior Problems: Differences Across Preschool Assessment of Attachment Classifications. Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010;15(3):391-406. PubMed PMID: 20603426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotional competence and behavior problems: Differences across Preschool Assessment of Attachment classifications. AU - Kidwell,Shari L, AU - Young,Marion E, AU - Hinkle,Lisa D, AU - Ratliff,Ashley D, AU - Marcum,Meagan E, AU - Martin,Cynthia N, PY - 2010/7/7/entrez PY - 2010/7/7/pubmed PY - 2010/10/30/medline SP - 391 EP - 406 JF - Clinical child psychology and psychiatry JO - Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - This study examined attachment in association with preschoolers' emotional functioning among 54 predominantly low-income families living in Appalachia. Attachment was assessed at age 4 years using the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978) and classified with the PAA (Crittenden, 2004). Emotional competence was measured via an interview about children's memories for six emotions, rated in terms of both emotion understanding and regulation. Parent-, teacher-, and self-reports of children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms were also completed. Questionnaires and interviews assessed socioeconomic risk and parental symptoms and negative childhood experiences. Children's PAA strategies were significantly associated with risks, emotion regulation and understanding, and symptoms. Children using highly coercive strategies showed the greatest difficulties. Emotion regulation and understanding also were associated with parent- and teacher-report of symptoms. These findings suggest that intervention efforts with at-risk youngsters should target not only attachment security, but also emotional competence skills. SN - 1461-7021 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20603426/Emotional_competence_and_behavior_problems:_Differences_across_Preschool_Assessment_of_Attachment_classifications_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1359104510367589?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -