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Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont.
Science. 2010 Jul 09; 329(5988):212-5.Sci

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that some plants and animals harbor microbial symbionts that protect them against natural enemies. Here we demonstrate that a maternally transmitted bacterium, Spiroplasma, protects Drosophila neotestacea against the sterilizing effects of a parasitic nematode, both in the laboratory and the field. This nematode parasitizes D. neotestacea at high frequencies in natural populations, and, until recently, almost all infections resulted in complete sterility. Several lines of evidence suggest that Spiroplasma is spreading in North American populations of D. neotestacea and that a major adaptive change to a symbiont-based mode of defense is under way. These findings demonstrate the profound and potentially rapid effects of defensive symbionts, which are increasingly recognized as major players in the ecology of species interactions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA. john.jaenike@rochester.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20616278

Citation

Jaenike, John, et al. "Adaptation Via Symbiosis: Recent Spread of a Drosophila Defensive Symbiont." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 329, no. 5988, 2010, pp. 212-5.
Jaenike J, Unckless R, Cockburn SN, et al. Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. Science. 2010;329(5988):212-5.
Jaenike, J., Unckless, R., Cockburn, S. N., Boelio, L. M., & Perlman, S. J. (2010). Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5988), 212-5. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1188235
Jaenike J, et al. Adaptation Via Symbiosis: Recent Spread of a Drosophila Defensive Symbiont. Science. 2010 Jul 9;329(5988):212-5. PubMed PMID: 20616278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. AU - Jaenike,John, AU - Unckless,Robert, AU - Cockburn,Sarah N, AU - Boelio,Lisa M, AU - Perlman,Steve J, PY - 2010/7/10/entrez PY - 2010/7/10/pubmed PY - 2010/7/27/medline SP - 212 EP - 5 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 329 IS - 5988 N2 - Recent studies have shown that some plants and animals harbor microbial symbionts that protect them against natural enemies. Here we demonstrate that a maternally transmitted bacterium, Spiroplasma, protects Drosophila neotestacea against the sterilizing effects of a parasitic nematode, both in the laboratory and the field. This nematode parasitizes D. neotestacea at high frequencies in natural populations, and, until recently, almost all infections resulted in complete sterility. Several lines of evidence suggest that Spiroplasma is spreading in North American populations of D. neotestacea and that a major adaptive change to a symbiont-based mode of defense is under way. These findings demonstrate the profound and potentially rapid effects of defensive symbionts, which are increasingly recognized as major players in the ecology of species interactions. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20616278/Adaptation_via_symbiosis:_recent_spread_of_a_Drosophila_defensive_symbiont_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20616278 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -