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Natural and anthropogenic mercury distribution in marine sediments from Hudson Bay, Canada.
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Aug 01; 44(15):5805-11.ES

Abstract

Twelve marine sediment cores from Hudson Bay, Canada, were collected to investigate the response of sub-Arctic marine sediments to atmospherically transported anthropogenic mercury (Hg). Modeling by a two-layer sediment mixing model suggests that the historical Hg deposition to most of the sediment cores reflects the known history of atmospheric Hg deposition in North America, with an onset of increasing anthropogenic Hg emissions in the late 1800s and early 1900s and a reduction of Hg deposition in the mid- to late-1900s. However, although anthropogenic Hg has contributed to a ubiquitous increase in Hg concentrations in sediments over the industrial era, the most elevated industrial-era sedimentary Hg concentrations only marginally exceed the upper preindustrial sedimentary Hg concentrations. Analysis of delta13C and relationship between Hg and organic matter capture suggests that the response of Hudson Bay sediments to changes in atmospheric Hg emissions is largely controlled by the particle flux in the system and that natural changes in organic matter composition and dynamics can cause variation in sedimentary Hg concentrations at least to the same extent as those caused by increasing anthropogenic Hg emissions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Earth Observation Science, Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20617840

Citation

Hare, Alexander A., et al. "Natural and Anthropogenic Mercury Distribution in Marine Sediments From Hudson Bay, Canada." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 44, no. 15, 2010, pp. 5805-11.
Hare AA, Stern GA, Kuzyk ZZ, et al. Natural and anthropogenic mercury distribution in marine sediments from Hudson Bay, Canada. Environ Sci Technol. 2010;44(15):5805-11.
Hare, A. A., Stern, G. A., Kuzyk, Z. Z., Macdonald, R. W., Johannessen, S. C., & Wang, F. (2010). Natural and anthropogenic mercury distribution in marine sediments from Hudson Bay, Canada. Environmental Science & Technology, 44(15), 5805-11. https://doi.org/10.1021/es100724y
Hare AA, et al. Natural and Anthropogenic Mercury Distribution in Marine Sediments From Hudson Bay, Canada. Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Aug 1;44(15):5805-11. PubMed PMID: 20617840.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Natural and anthropogenic mercury distribution in marine sediments from Hudson Bay, Canada. AU - Hare,Alexander A, AU - Stern,Gary A, AU - Kuzyk,Zou Zou A, AU - Macdonald,Robie W, AU - Johannessen,Sophia C, AU - Wang,Feiyue, PY - 2010/7/13/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/12/29/medline SP - 5805 EP - 11 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 44 IS - 15 N2 - Twelve marine sediment cores from Hudson Bay, Canada, were collected to investigate the response of sub-Arctic marine sediments to atmospherically transported anthropogenic mercury (Hg). Modeling by a two-layer sediment mixing model suggests that the historical Hg deposition to most of the sediment cores reflects the known history of atmospheric Hg deposition in North America, with an onset of increasing anthropogenic Hg emissions in the late 1800s and early 1900s and a reduction of Hg deposition in the mid- to late-1900s. However, although anthropogenic Hg has contributed to a ubiquitous increase in Hg concentrations in sediments over the industrial era, the most elevated industrial-era sedimentary Hg concentrations only marginally exceed the upper preindustrial sedimentary Hg concentrations. Analysis of delta13C and relationship between Hg and organic matter capture suggests that the response of Hudson Bay sediments to changes in atmospheric Hg emissions is largely controlled by the particle flux in the system and that natural changes in organic matter composition and dynamics can cause variation in sedimentary Hg concentrations at least to the same extent as those caused by increasing anthropogenic Hg emissions. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20617840/Natural_and_anthropogenic_mercury_distribution_in_marine_sediments_from_Hudson_Bay_Canada_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es100724y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -