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Household smoking behaviours and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among infants: are current strategies effectively protecting our young?
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2010 Jun; 34(3):269-73.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of infant exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among infants attending child health clinics in regional NSW; the association between such exposure and household smoking behaviours; and the factors associated with smoking restrictions in households with infants.

METHODS

Parents completed a computer-based questionnaire and infant urine samples were collected. Information was obtained regarding the smoking behaviours of household members and samples were analysed for cotinine.

RESULTS

Twenty seven per cent of infants had detectable levels of cotinine. Infant ETS exposure was significantly associated with the smoking status of household members, absence of complete smoking bans in smoking households and having more than one smoker in the home. Smoking households were significantly less likely to have a complete smoking ban in place.

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that a significant proportion of the population group most vulnerable to ETS were exposed.

IMPLICATIONS

Future efforts to reduce children's exposure to ETS need to target cessation by smoking parents, and smoking bans in households of infants where parents are smokers if desired reductions in childhood ETS-related illness are to be realised.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hunter New England Population Health, New South Wales; The University of Newcastle, New South Wales.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20618268

Citation

Daly, Justine B., et al. "Household Smoking Behaviours and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke Among Infants: Are Current Strategies Effectively Protecting Our Young?" Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 34, no. 3, 2010, pp. 269-73.
Daly JB, Wiggers JH, Burrows S, et al. Household smoking behaviours and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among infants: are current strategies effectively protecting our young? Aust N Z J Public Health. 2010;34(3):269-73.
Daly, J. B., Wiggers, J. H., Burrows, S., & Freund, M. (2010). Household smoking behaviours and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among infants: are current strategies effectively protecting our young? Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34(3), 269-73. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00525.x
Daly JB, et al. Household Smoking Behaviours and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke Among Infants: Are Current Strategies Effectively Protecting Our Young. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2010;34(3):269-73. PubMed PMID: 20618268.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Household smoking behaviours and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among infants: are current strategies effectively protecting our young? AU - Daly,Justine B, AU - Wiggers,John H, AU - Burrows,Sally, AU - Freund,Megan, PY - 2010/7/13/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/9/14/medline SP - 269 EP - 73 JF - Australian and New Zealand journal of public health JO - Aust N Z J Public Health VL - 34 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of infant exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among infants attending child health clinics in regional NSW; the association between such exposure and household smoking behaviours; and the factors associated with smoking restrictions in households with infants. METHODS: Parents completed a computer-based questionnaire and infant urine samples were collected. Information was obtained regarding the smoking behaviours of household members and samples were analysed for cotinine. RESULTS: Twenty seven per cent of infants had detectable levels of cotinine. Infant ETS exposure was significantly associated with the smoking status of household members, absence of complete smoking bans in smoking households and having more than one smoker in the home. Smoking households were significantly less likely to have a complete smoking ban in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that a significant proportion of the population group most vulnerable to ETS were exposed. IMPLICATIONS: Future efforts to reduce children's exposure to ETS need to target cessation by smoking parents, and smoking bans in households of infants where parents are smokers if desired reductions in childhood ETS-related illness are to be realised. SN - 1753-6405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20618268/Household_smoking_behaviours_and_exposure_to_environmental_tobacco_smoke_among_infants:_are_current_strategies_effectively_protecting_our_young L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00525.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -